Ang Pow Giving

On the first day of Chinese New Year as Confucianist practice dictates, the entire household of an extended family would tidy themselves up, all nicely coiffured before presenting themselves to the head of the household, (generally the matriarch) to receive special blessings and ang pows (red colored packets containing money symbolizing good luck, prosperity, great health and joy). As receiving ang pows is hierarchical, so it is with the givers, each taking turns distributing whilst juniors kow tow and wish ‘Keong Hee Huat Chye’ as a mark of respect to the givers. In our family we went a step further by serving tea to the elders. It is also customary that once a child got married, they are obligated to give ang pows to their parents. The unmarried are exempted from ang pow giving because to the Chinese, they are still rated a child. Thus, any family members can receive ang pows for as long as they remained single. In our Hokkien tradition, only the womenfolk gives away ang pows. Reason is that the menfolk are supposedly the breadwinners of the family whilst the womenfolk are in charge of household affairs.

This is my extended family.

1st pic- my grandma Gek Kee, receiving blessings from my great grandma, matriarch Saw Kit, at Boon Siew Mansion. Generally as a senior in the family herself, my grandma is no longer entitled to ang pows but I guess that also depends on the generosity of individuals and the wealth of each family.. Matriarch Saw Kit’s life sized bronze statue still graces the Home of the Infirmary, Penang.

2nd pic- Aunt Guat Eng, Aunt Gim Ean (deceased), Aunt Guat Hong, Aunt Loh Ean, Uncle Kah Poh (deceased), unidentified Aunt and my mom (deceased). Aunt Guat Hong and 2nd Tniau Seng Leong kow towed.

3rd pic- Tiny tots group pic with matriarch. Kah Heng (deceased), Kah Bee, and Kah Kheng (deceased).

An extended family has added advantages except for privacy and at least three generations of one household lives and stays together. That was the in -thing of that period for well to do family’s with big houses.

Images copyrighted. Circa 50s.

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Mai Khiam Kuay Ni

“Mai Khiam Kuay Ni” is a Hokkien saying uttered before Chinese New Year. Translated, it means “don’t defer your debts till the next year”. Though this has no real life connotation as most big companies does owe, it grew into a widespread belief somehow rooted into the community. But no doubt it has its goodness. It’s good practice not to be a lousy paymaster because everyone during the festive season needs cash to prepare for the yearly ritual and celebration hence the practice of giving bonuses a week before Chinese New Year. Just like problems that doesn’t get solved, it will slowly pile up into one big unsolvable package. Below is the image of God of Wealth a deity if placed in your home will ensure prosperity in your household.

Hokkien Phrases U-Z

~hungry ghost~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~hungry ghost~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ULU- A remote place.

UM BONG BONG- Very dark.

UM CHI- Late night thorns. Cinema Touts.

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WA CHIAK EAM CHAY KUAY LU CHIAK BI- I ate more salt than you have eaten rice. Normally told to a younger person by an elderly when exerting an experienced assessment.

WA KAR LU KONG- Let me tell you.

WA KONG TANG LU KONG SAI- I say East you say West. To describe someone who misunderstands you or wasn’t listening and consequently did the wrong thing.

WAH LAN/WAH LAN EH- Oh Penis! Used when surprised by something.

WAH LAU/WAH LAU EH- The more polite variation of Wah Lan.

WAH PIANG- Also more polite version of Wah Lan.

YAU KWEE- Hungry ghost. It describes a glutton or avaricious person.

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About the Phrases:~

The author/owner has also compiled for record, a collection of everyday Hokkien Phrases to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These phrases are as much as possible being conserved in its purest state despite having some which had been mixed with other local dialects and languages but nevertheless the Hokkien lingo took prominence over the rest. This list is continuously updated.

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Hokkien Phrases P-T

 

~berthing~ image copyrght Kris Lee 2012

~berthing~
image copyrght Kris Lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PAIK CHEK- Exasperation or frustration.

PAI OO LUNG- Refering to a person/a blurr cock who always catches the wrong end of the stick.

PA KAT- To conspire/Gang up against.

PANG CHIEW- Let go of the hand. To give chance.

PANG PUAY KEE- Fly Aeroplane. To be stood up.

PAR CHAT- Full tummy and pocket. A wealthy person.

PATTERN CHUT KAR LIOW- A person’s real self is revealed.

PEH KHI LAI THIOW- To jump up. A visibly upset person.

PEH PHI KONG CHU- White nose scholar. An amorous gentlemen.

PEH TH’I KI- Climb iron bars. Someone who is behind bars/in prison or in a police lock up.

PHAI KIA- Bad kid, A gangster/triad.

PHAI KHUAN- Bad manners.

PHAI SAY-  Humility.

PHAR BAY SI- Beat but won’t die. Indestructible or invincible.

PHAR CHIAO BAK- Beat bird eye. It describes someone with a squint/cockeye or someone who is not observant enough.

PHAR CH’IEW CHENG- To hit the hand gun. To masturbate.

PHAR PNAI SENG LI- Spoil business.  To describe someone who chases away prospects of others.

PHAR PUAY KEE- Beat Aeroplane. To masturbate.

PHAK THOR- Going on a date.

PHIAN CHIAK- Cheat to eat. An illegal way to earn a living.

PHONG TAI HAI- Appear bloated. As in a person’s face.

PHOR LUM PHAR- To carry balls. An act of sycophancy. Buttering someone up, or brown-nosing.

PHU BOR KNIA- Fucks wife and children. Swear Language.

PHUAK LENG CHWEE- Throw cold water. To denegrade another’s plan/idea/dream.

PHUI CHOW NUAR- To spit smelly spittle. Hence to spit on someone is a way of ridiculing someone over his actions or words.

PHU KI MAK/MAK PHU KI- Your mother’s clitoris. Swear Language.

PIEN HENG- Changed in form. A changed person.

PIEN MOR KWI- To turn into a ghost. Used when a good person changes to bad.

PNIA CHUI/PNIA TIN- Pour water/Pour team. To get into unruly fights with gangsters.

PNIA MIA- Pour your life. Working against time.

PNUA KIN, PEH NIAU- Half a kati, eight tahils. To describe something similar.

PUAY KI TNIAU/PUAY KI POR- Airport. A flat chested woman.

PUM CHET- Puncture.  How a flat tyre is called.

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RO  JIAK- A salad of mixed vegetables eaten with prawn paste sauce. To describe something eclectic/messy.

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SAM SENG- A ruthless person, either a gangster or even a thug or just an arrogant person.

SANG G’NEK- Bent.

SAO KOR NA LENG-  Sao means sweep & ‘Kor na leng’ is a local colloquial for ‘cornering’ hence to compromise a corner in driving.

SARK BO SAIK- Not enough boiling. Like a half boil egg. To describe a naive person.

SART CHUI- Kill Hand. An Assassin

SA YANG- Borrowed from a Malay word which means Love.

SEK AR NI- Eurasians. From the Arab word nasrani meaning Nazarene, or Christians.

SENG LI CHO TUA- Business getting bigger. Used (with a bit of sarcasm) to comment on someone who appears to be giving others the impression that he/she is doing very well in his/her undertaking.

SI AR NEH KHUAN EH- That’s the way it is. To reaffirm that your way of doing something is in fact correct.

SIAR SUAY- To embarass.

SIAM- Get out of the way/move away. Used to shoo people away/To dodge a task.

SIAM SAI HONG- To run away from the wind. To be hiding/like a fugitive.

SIAN THOW ONG- A bullshitter.

SI BAI- A placid person.

SI GIN NA- Dying child. Used to scold naughty kids.

SI KI TENG TARN- Four nails sounding. An indicative that death is around the corner.

SI KNIA SI SOON- Dead children and dead grand children. A bad curse. Swear Language.

SI LANG KHUAN CHUT KA LIOW- Dead man’s personality surfaces. A person’s bad attitude begin to show.

SI SIM- Heart goes dead. No longer affectionate.

SIM CHENG BO HO- Heart is troubled. Used on a person who is not in a good mood.

SIM KNUA BO LART/ SIM KNUA THAU BO LART- Heart is weak. To express disappointment over a rude news or someone else’s action/inaction.

SIM LENG- Cold heart or frozen heart. Used by a person to describe how he/she no longer feels affection towards someone they love.

SIM TNIA- Heart ache. Used by a person who recollects his past mistake/poor judgement/inaction over an investment that could bring him good returns today.

SI OR KWI- Dead tortoise/dead pimp. Swear Language.

SIO PHAK KAY- Fighting cock. A formidable pugilist who never loses.

SIO SIAR- Embarassing. Similar to PHAI SAY.

SIONG NOW- Injuring the brain. Used on bird brains.

SIOW CHAR BOR- A crazy woman.

SIOW LIOW- Gone crazy.  Used whenever a situation or something has gone wrong.

SIOW TAR POR- A crazy man.

SIOW TING TONG- A dumbbell or crazy person.

SI SNUA LAI- Loose loose come. To describe someone who uses weird methods to perform a task.

SOAK HUEK KU- Suck Blood Beetle. A blood sucking negotiator.

SNAR KI KHAR- Three legged. Sycophancy.

SNAR KHAR CHUAR- Three legged snake. A sycophant that’s up to no good.

SNAR CHAP LAK LEH MOOI- Thirty six doors.  A sewage truck.

SNAR JIT HONG, SI JIT HOR- Three days of wind, three days of rain. To describe a moody, fickle person.

SNAR SUKU- Three quarter. To describe a person who had gone cuckoo.

SNI KIAM CHYE- Salted vegetable. To describe an old unmarried woman.

SNUA KOO/SNUA KOO PEK- Mountain tortoise. Used to describe or suggest someone as being unsophisticated and ignorant. A country bumpkin.

SNUA PAR KAU- Mountain monkey. A naive person.

SNUA NIOW CHU- Mountain rat. To describe communists.

SOM BONG- An arrogant/haughty person. Adapted from a Malay word of the same meaning.

SOO LANG BO SOO TIN- Loose people but not team. Used to describe what sportsmanship is about. That even when you are underhanded, you fight till the end even if it means losing.

SUAN SIAU- Fidgetty sperm. To criticize.

SUM PAT THONG- A mad/crazy person.

SUP SUP SUAY- As easy as drinking water. To describe a task that is supposedly easy to perform.

SWEE SWEE BOH KUAY CHOOI- Beautiful as it is not rinsed in water. Something or someone perfect.

SYIOK KAR BAY SI- Feel so good until one wants to die.  Delightful pleasure.

SYIOK KAR BAY PANG PHUI- Feel so good till cannot fart. Feeling delightfully great.

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TAHAN MATI- Withstand death. A determined fighter/One who doesn’t give up easily.

TAN KU KU- Wait forever. The forever is asserted here meaning it won’t happen.

TAPI- But. Adapted from a Malay word of the same meaning.

TAR POW- As in takeaway of food. Adapted from a Cantonese word of the same meaning.

TA TA PAI- Everytime/Always.

TENG KHOK KHOK- Extremely hard.

THAI LANG PANG HUAY- To kill and set fire. A massacre.

THAU HONG- Wind in the head. A person gone fruity.

THAU SIO SIO BUAY LENG LENG- Warm Head, Cold Tail. Start with enthusiasm but fizzles out in the end. A bad organiser.

THAU TNIA- Headache. Can also mean troublesome.

THARN CHIAK/THARN LOOI- To earn a living.

THARN BOH CHIAK/THARN BOH LOOI-Not earning anything.

THIAU BU CHAR BOR- Dancing lady. A guest relations officer who works in a girly bar.

THI KHI- Iron teeth. Stubborn.

THOO LU/THOO LU KU- A bald headed person.

THOR HUEK- Vomit blood. Expression used in great surprise/disbelieve over someone else’s stupidity.

THNI OR OR- Black sky. An expression that rain is going to fall.

THUM SIM- Greedy Heart. A greedy person.

TIAM KOW KA SI LANG- A quiet dog do bite. A quiet person can be dangerous.

TIOK KA MAK BAY JIN KNIA- Get it till the mother can’t even recognise her own child. A severe problem.

TIOK MARK- Being marked.

TIOK PH’NI- Taken advantage of.

TIOK TNUA- Being stood up.

TIOK TUA KEE- Get a big dick. A person who landed himself in great trouble.

TNEH KA LUM PHAR TUA SAY LIAP- Press testicles till both are uneven in size. Describes a person whose plan, plot or decision backfired.

TNEH TIAU/TNEH TIAU LUM PHAR- Press testicles.  Describes a person whose plan, plot or decision backfired.

T’NG KHUI- Long breath. Used on long winded people/A person who emphasizes a point far too many times.

TNIAU KAIR- Fussy with price. Used on people who rejects a good gift/proposal or offer.

TO BALIK- Upside down or Inside out. A reversal. Balik is adapted from a Malay word meaning to go back.

TO LONG- Help. A cry for aid. Adapted from a Malay word of the same meaning.

TUA KANG- A big river. To describe someone telling a tall story.

TUA KHANG- A big hole. A loose woman.

TUA LAN PHAR- Big testis. Used on people who don’t walk normally.

TUA LAU CHUI- A leaking vagina. Someone telling a tall story.

TUA LIAP LANG- Big ball people. An important person as in a politician/dignitary/rulers or in more casual terms, a VIP.

TUA PHAI KNIAR- Big naughty child. A big time gangster.

TUA PHIAN SIAN- Big Bluffing God. A confidence trickster.

TUA SAY KANG- Big small flow(as in a river). A boastful person.

TUA SIM- Big heart. A greedy person.

TUA THOW- Big head. To describe the head of a company/team.

TU LAN- Pig’s testis. Disgruntled/Pissed off.

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About the Phrases:~

The author/owner has also compiled for record, a collection of everyday Hokkien Phrases to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These phrases are as much as possible being conserved in its purest state despite having some which had been mixed with other local dialects and languages but nevertheless the Hokkien lingo took prominence over the rest. This list is continuously updated.

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Hokkien Phrases K-O

 

~eye of the lion~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~eye of the lion~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KAM CHENG- Relationship.

KAM LAN- Suck penis. A phrase exerting one’s disapproval over another’s way of doing things.

KAM PHOOI- Suck fart. What’s the point?  More polite than “Kam Lan”, it can be used in jest.

KAN- Fuck. A decent word meaning coitus that has been extensively emphasized as Swear Language.

KANA LAN ANEH- Just like a penis. An insulting phrase.

KANA SAI- Like shit. To describe something upsetting.

KAN KA CHI BAI NUA- Fuck till the vagina is diseased. Swear Language.

KAN KAY- Fuck chicken. An untrustworthy person. Swear Language.

KAN KIO- Fuck brinjal. Swear Language.

KAN NI NA/KAN NI NEH- Fuck you/fucking. Swear Language.

KAN NI NOW BO/KAN LU EH LAU BO- Fuck your mother. Swear Language.

KAN NI NOW BO EH CHAO CHI BAI/KAN LU EH LAU BO EH CHOW CHI BAI- Fuck your mother’s smelly cunt. Swear Language.

KAR HUAY SNIAU CHIOK SAR SAY- Lending a comb from a monk. A futile request.

KAR KI LANG- Buddies or close companions as in relatives.

KAY BO KHAR CH’WNOOI- Chicken backside. A coward.

KAY BO PHIOW- Chicken brand. A coward.

KAY PO/KAY PO CH’NI- A busybody or nosey parker.

KEH GAU- Acting smart. To describe someone who bit off more than he could chew/To act smarter than one actually is.

KEH NAN PUSING- An about turn. To do an about turn. The word ‘pusing’ is adapted from a Malay word of the same meaning.

KEK KA LUM PHAR TUA SAY LIAP- Pressured till my testicle is uneven is size. To describe unimaginable stress brought by others carelessness or mistake.

KENG CHIAK- Choose to eat. A person who is choosy about his meal.

KHI KAI KAI- Go walk walk.  To go out for a jaunt.

KHAR CH’NOOI CH’NIAU- Itchy backside. A bad attempt to improve something/situation which is best left as it is.

KHARM LAN/KWAI LAN- Cover testis. A mischievous person.

KHARN KHOR- Bring suffering. Troublesome, don’t feel at ease or uncomfortable.

KHANG THAU- Hole Head. A good opportunity.

KHAU CHA BOR- Scrape a woman. To flirt/court a woman.

KHAU CHIAU UAI- Crying bird bent. To describe a person who shrills instead of talking nicely.

KHAU HONG- To scrape the wind. Going for a joy ride.

KHAU PEH KHAU BO- Cry Father, Cry mother. To make a lot of noise/create a scene because of some dissatisfaction.

KH’IAM TIOK PHAR- Nearly got beaten. To forewarn someone of the dangers of his actions.

KHI CHIO- Acting vainly/daringly.

KHI HOR CHNIAU KAN- Let the elephant fuck you. Swear Language.

KHI HOR KOW KAN- Let the dog fuck you. Swear Language

KHI HOR KWEE KAN- Let the ghost fuck you. Swear Language.

KHI HOR LANG KAN/KHI HOR LANG SOOT- Let people fuck you. Swear Language.

KHI HOR SWNAR TU KAN- Let the wild pig fuck you. Swear Language.

KHIAU KHAR EYO LUM PHAR- To raise one’s legs and shake one’s genitals. It describes someone being extremely idle.

KHI SI/KHI SI LA LU- Go and die, you go and die. Swear Language.

KHI SIOW KIN- Lifting one’s mad artery. Violently agitated/ Frenzied/Berserk.

KHIT CHIAK AR- Beggar. To describe one who is or behaving like a beggar.

KHNUAR LANG EONG BAK CHEW AU- Look at someone with the tip of your eye. Means do not take that person seriously.

KHOON KAR JIT THAU CHIOK KHAR CHNOOI- Sleep till the sun shines on your buttocks. To describe a late riser.

KIAM CHYE- Salted vegetables. To describe anything crumpled or messy.

KIAM HU- Dried salted fish. Slipper/flip flops.

KIAM KONG UWA SNEH LIOW NUA- The lesser we talk, the more saliva we save. The lesser we talk, the lesser frustration we get. Used to stop people from arguing.

KIAM SIAP- Salty and Bitter. To describe someone stingy.

KNIAR SI- Afraid to die. Used to admonish someone for being cowardly.

KNIAR SU- Afraid of losing. To describe competitive people.

KIM TANG TANG- To describe someone who is very rich or opulently dressed. Literally dripping with gold.

KIN BO TIT- Veins not aligned. To describe an agitated/upset individual.

KIN CHIO KNIA- Banana child. A western educated Chinese.

KIN CHEONG- Nervous or uptight.

KIN KHAR KIN CHEW- Fast hand, fast leg. A pro-active person.

KIO KAY- Call chicken. To procure sexual favor from a prostitute.

KIU KIU KIO- Shriek and Yell. To make a lot of noise.

KNAR KNAR CHO/KNAR KNAR LAI- Be daring to do/Be more daring. An advise as not to contemplate too much before executing something.

KNIA KAR BAY CHUT SNIA- Scared till dumbfounded.

KNIA SI LANG- Scare the dead/to scare people to death. Uttered when one is frightened.

KNIA SI WAR- Scare me to death. Uttered when someone is frightened.

KONG LAN CHIOW UWA- To speak prick language. Swear Language.

KONG HA MI LAN CHIAU/KONG HA MI LUM PHAR- Say what penis/Say what testicles. What cock are you talking about? Swear Language.

KONG LANG OW BUAY UAR- Talking behind peoples back. Gossiping.

KONG SNAR KONG SI- Talk three talk four. To engage in idle talk or gossip.

KONG SI- To share. Adapted from a Malay word of the same meaning.

KOPI KNIA- Coffee boy. The waiter at a coffee shop. Kopi is adapted from a Malay word meaning coffee.

KOPI TIAM- Coffee shop.

KOR KA KI- Take care and teach oneself. A selfish individual.

KOW GIAK BEH EONG- Really useless.

KOW GIAK CH’NI- Really crafty.

KOW GIAK HIONG- Really fierce.

KOW GIAK THUM SIM- Really greedy.

KOW GIAK ULU- Really remote.

KU KU CHIOW- Penis. Used when speaking to children. Equivalent of “little pee pee”.

KUM LAN- Suck Cock. Uttered when someone wants to do something that don’t make sense.

KUM POOI- Suck flatulence. Uttered when someone wants to do something useless.

KWAI LAN KNIAR- Child of a naughty penis. Mischievous kid.

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LAN CHIAU- Penis. Swear Language.

LAN CHIAU BIN- Penis face. Swear Language.

LAN CHIAU HA LU KAR- Let you bite my penis. Swear Language.

LAN SAI LANG- Dick shit person. Swear Language.

LAN SI LAN YUNG- A show off. Adapted from a Cantonese phrase of the same meaning.

LAN THOOI – Penis shaft. Swear Language.

LAO BEH- Old Horse. An outdated product or thinking.

LAO CHEOW- Old bird. An experienced individual.

LAO HOR PHUAY OON EAM- Nutmeg dipped in salt. To describe a very stingy person.

LAO HOR THAU NIAU CHU BUAY- Head of a tiger, tail of a rat. To describe a person who shows off initially but backs off after being confronted.

LAO KHWEE- Leak in breath. To lose face/ great embarassment.

LAO PHI KHANG HUAY- Nose bleed. To describe one’s reaction in an arousing situation.

LAO YAH- Things that are old, not trendy or up to date.

LIAK BOH KIEW- Catch no ball. Someone who fail to understand something explained to them.

LIM CHIEW CHOOI- To describe a drunk or someone behaving like a drunkard.

LONG KOW EE, LONG TOK TENG- Bang Chair, Bang Table. An extremely angered/pissed off person.

LONG TIOK OO SNIA- If the car gets knock there will surely be a sound.

LUAN CHU KONG- Simply said. To describe people who states wrong facts.

LUAN LUAN LAI- Simply simply do. To do things recklessly/haphazardly or without a plan.

LU EH CHAU CHI BAI- Your smelly vagina. Swear Language.

LU HO SAY BO- Are you alright? Meaning are you doing well in life or your career?

LU KHI HOR LANG KAN- You go and let people fuck you. Swear Language.

LU KHI SI- You go and die. Swear Language.

LU KONG HA MI LAN CHIAU- What penis are you talking about? Swear Language.

LUM PHAR- Testis. A perfectly normal word that became Swear Language over time.

LUM PHAR BIN- Testis Face. Swear Language.

LUM PAH PAH LAN- Testicles hitting back at the penis. A plan that backfire.

LU PUN SI- You also. A kickback when accused.

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MAK CHI BAI- Your mother’s vagina. Swear Language.

MAK EE KONG- An old granduncle. A colloquial phrase.

MAK EE PO- An old grand-aunt. A colloquial phrase.

MAI HIAM BAY PNAI, AI HIAM KANA SAI- If you’re not picky, it’s not bad. If you are picky, it’s really like shit. To describe a situation or something that can be looked at either way.

MAI SIOW SIOW- Don’t be mad. A warning not to fool with things beyond your ability.

MANA OO ENG- Where got free? A general reply when asked to do something when one is engaged.

MAN KNIA- Don’t be scared. An exhortation to do things boldly.

MATI KONG KHIAU- Dead with belly up. An expression used by children to describe something that is dead or a warning to stop something from happening that could result in an accident/death/mishap.

MOH PENG TIOW TENG- Pock face hanging lanterns. A pock face person.

MM BAT HUAY- Cannot recognise product. People who do not know their trade.

MM CHAI SI- Ignorant of death. An audacious person/cavalier about consequences.

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NOR JIT HONG SNAR JIT HOR- Two days of wind, three days of rain. To describe someone’s unpredictable mood/personality.

NOR THOW CHUA/NOR KI KHAR TAK BOH SIANG CHOON- Double headed snake/Two legs stepping on different boats. A dangerous person who gains favor and confidence by artful insinuations between enemies.

NUI THOR CHIM KOOT- Soft soil is easily dug. A self effacing person is easily taken advantage of.

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OO CHENG BO TH’NAR- With relationship, nothing blocks. A buddy relationship. More like blood brothers.

OO HI KHNUAR- Got show to watch. Used when one contemplates a reciprocal hysteria after something bad/incorrect was done.

OO SAY- Has ability. The opposite of “Boh Say”.

OO NYIA BO?- Is there a shadow? Means is it for real or are you sure?

OR BAR- Black person. A dark man.

OR UM- Black and dark. To describe a persons misfortune arising out of unattentiveness.

OR UM HIN- Black and Dark Dizzy. To describe a feeling of dizzyness/Like one who is on the verge of fainting.

OR UM THNI- Black and Dark sky. To suggest that rain is falling soon.

OR UM SAY KAI- Dark world. Normally used on people who foil others plan.

ORK KAY BO- Fierce hen. A very fierce woman.

OR KWI KENG- Tortoise Lodge. A brothel.

OR KWI THAU- Tortoise Head. A pimp.

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About the Phrases:~

The author/owner has also compiled for record, a collection of everyday Hokkien Phrases to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These phrases are as much as possible being conserved in its purest state despite having some which had been mixed with other local dialects and languages but nevertheless the Hokkien lingo took prominence over the rest. This list is continuously updated.

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