Hum Bun Ay Cha Bor

(Version in Hokkien)

Hum Bun Ay Cha Bor Bong Bo Lor

Boh Lau Mnua Ee Tok Lau Khor

.

(Version in English)

Clumsy women does not have a feel for things

If her sarong did not drop, it will be her pants.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying pokes fun at clumsy women.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Kong Uwa Bo Li Eu

(Version in Hokkien)

Kong Uwa Bo Li Eu

Tok Por Luan Chu Jiu

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(Version in English)

For those who speak senselessly

Are like table cloths that mops in an indefinite direction

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying pokes fun at those who try to impress others with their senseless speech.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Tua Lang Say

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Tua

Kong Say Snia Uwa

Lang Say

Snia Tet Pet Tua

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(Version in English)

High position people

Are soft spoken

Those who are rank lower

Are the loudest

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying pokes fun at those lowly rank people who love to exert their weight around to get things done or just to show off when the fact is higher rank individuals seldom display traits like this.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Tua Chneh

(Version in Hokkien)

Tua Chneh

Chneh Ka Khi Sio Meh

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(Version in English)

Keep on bickering

Bicker till quarrel breaks out

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying condemns bickering as it might blow into a full fledge quarrel.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Bo Pneh Bo Thnia Swnooi Ho Mia

(Version in Hokkien)

Bo Pneh Bo Thnia

Swnooi Ho Mia

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(Version in English)

No illness, no pain

Can be considered one is having a good life already

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying is a sweetener in conversations. The underlying message to others is that above all, health is wealth.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Bin Ow Ow

(Version in Hokkien)

Bin Ow Ow

Lang Kh’wai Lau

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(Version in English)

Frowning faces

Ages one faster

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying discourages one from frowning as it is believed to make one age faster? This is so because only when one is tormented or worry do one frown.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Ow Barn

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Ow Barn

Cho Lang Eh Sim Arn

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(Version in English)

Stubborn people

Irks our heart

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying describes how stubborn mules irritates or torment our heart.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Kong Uwa Luan Chu Pian

(Version in Hokkien)

Kong Uwa Luan Chu Pian

Th’nia Ka Thau Khak Lian

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(Version in English)

Some people simply loves to lie

As we listen, it makes our head spin

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying ridicules the habitual liar.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Swee Swee

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Swee Swee

Chng Ka Mm Chnia Kow Kwee

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(Version in English)

Some are natural beauties

But dress and made up so ostentatiously

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying is normally said in a well-meaning fashion or to someone familiar like a family member? Sometimes there’d be moments where one is influenced by friends when it comes to make up and dress sense and to be accommodating just to be well liked can spell disaster to one’s look especially when one is ill advised.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Kow Jin Tua Chu Lang

(Version in Hokkien)

Kow Jin Tua Chu Lang

Bo Jin Gua Bin Lang

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(Version in English)

Dogs only recognises their master

Not outsiders

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks of loyalty and futility in trying to convince others to your viewpoint when they have their own mindset and believe which may also be guided by what their superior wanted them to carry out.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Sim Ho Lang O Lo

(Version in Hokkien)

Sim Ho

Lang O Lo

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(Version in English)

A good heart

Wins praises from others

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying praises people who possesses good traits. They will be well respected.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Kiam, Lang Kow Kwai

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Kiam

Ka Looi Sniau Liam

Lang Kow Kwai

Cho Luan Say Kai

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(Version in English)

If a person is miserly

It is because he got too close to money

If a person is a schemer

He will turn the world upside down.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks about two kinds of people. The miser and the schemer. And it implicates the kind of danger and disaster one would be exposed to if one were to co-relate with a schemer than a miser.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chiak Peh Hoon, Miar Bay Oon

(Version in Hokkien)

Chiak Peh Hoon

Miar Bay Oon

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(Version in English)

Consuming Heroin

Won’t assure you a long life.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying sends out a clear cut message to drug addicts about the dangers.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Knia Oo Hau, Knia Kut Lat

(Version in Hokkien)

Knia Oo Hau

Kor Peh Bo Lau

Knia Kut Lat

Sneh Liau Lat

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(Version in English)

Filial offsprings

Will take care of their parents

Hardworking offsprings

Doesn’t need much guidance

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying praises filial and hardworking children but also acts as a constant reminder to children about the importance of these values.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lim Chiu Sian

(Version in Hokkien)

Lim Chiu Sian

Knia Lor Tian Tian

Kooi Jit Mabuk

Tisi Kah Ay Oak

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(Version in English)

Alcoholic

Stumbling as you walk

Getting drunk the whole day

When are you going to learn?

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying advises against excessive drinking.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Puak Kiau Keh Huay Liau

(Version in Hokkien)

Puak Kiau

Keh Huay Liau

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(Version in English)

Gambling

Takes away one’s fortune

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying advises one against compulsive gambling. For it is said that where the Chinese are, there gambling would be and many have lost a great fortune because of it resulting in hardship within one’s family. There are other serious implications such as stealing and robbing as a result of losing everything on the gambling table.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Oo Looi, Lang Bo Looi

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Oo Looi

Chit Si Kay Lang Tui

Lang Bo Looi

Chit Si Kay Kui Tua Tui

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(Version in English)

If one is rich

Suitors are everywhere

If one is poor

They are found everywhere.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying addresses a commonplace truth of the south east and the effects of what fortune can do.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Oo Looi Ay Ang, Bo Looi Ay Bor

(Version in Hokkien)

Oo Looi Ay Ang

Chiak Cheng Pharng Pharng

Bo Looi Ay Ang

Choo Lai Kharng Kharng

Oo Looi Ay Bor

Bay Chiak Khor

Bo Looi Ay Bor

Hock Sai Chor

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(Version in English)

A rich husband

Eat, wear, smells good

But a poor husband

The house is always empty

A rich wife

Cannot adapt to hardship

But a poor wife

Will always appease her elders.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying addresses a commonplace truth of the south east.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Looi Swee Long Chong Ay

(Version in Hokkien)

Looi Swee Long Chong Ay

Looi Bo Swee Long Chong Bay

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(Version in English)

Everything is possible if you are a good paymaster.

Nothing is possible if you are a bad paymaster.

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About this rhyme:~

This rhyme is often heard uttered in humor in between business dealings. When one seeks the help of the other or engage him for his services, the helper sometimes utter this proverb tactlessly to make his term known.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Thau Thi Ka K’nui K’nui

(Version in Hokkien)

Thau Thi Ka K’nui K’nui

Bo Cha Bor Ai Tui

.

(Version in English)

Whole head shaven bald

Difficult to attract women.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying is often said in jest or to tease someone familiar to you.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lim Chiu Lim Tar Tar

(Version in Hokkien)

Lim Chiu Lim Tar Tar

Meh Ni Sneh Baba

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(Version in English)

When one consumes liquor, make sure no drop is left in the glass

So that when the new year comes by, one is blessed with a son.

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This rhyme/proverb/saying is always heard in wedding ceremonies when toasting for prosperity to the newly weds. To the traditional Chinese family, sons are more important than daughters as daughters generally gets married off when the time comes. However times have changed and many families prefer daughters than sons as they are more loyal and filial when they grow up.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Gong Gong Bo Suay Ong

(Version in Hokkien)

Gong Gong Bo Suay Ong

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(Version in English)

One may be stupid but one may also be blessed with alot of luck.

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This rhyme/proverb/saying confirms stories about poor people striking it rich in social welfare lotteries hence this saying.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chye Uak Oo Hau

(Version in Hokkien)

Chye Uak Oo Hau

Ho Kuay Si Liau Tuay Kah Kau

.

(Version in English)

Better to have filial offsprings when one is alive

Than to be faithfully worshiped upon after death.

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This rhyme/proverb/saying preaches Confucianism and its tenets about filial piety.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Keong Hee Huat Chye

(Version in Hokkien)

Keong Hee Huat Chye

Ang Pow Chit Pow Lai

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(Version in English)

Wishing you a Happy and Prosperous New Year

May I have one Red Packet please?

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying is normally uttered by children to the adults during Chinese New Year where it is customary that the elder gives them a red colored packet(Ang Pow) containing money as an expression of good luck throughout the new year. Nevetheless adults narrates this in jest when they meet friends and relatives to poke fun!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Choon Kuay Chooi Bo Hoon

(Version in Hokkien)

Choon Kuay Chooi Bo Hoon

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(Version in English)

The vessel sailed by with no traces of ripple behind.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks about ungrateful people as they tend to forget favors as quickly as when they needed them.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Tiok Pnia Ka Eh Ho Mia

(Version in Hokkien)

Tiok Pnia Ka Eh Ho Mia

.

(Version in English)

One needs to strive to have a promising future ahead.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This traditional rhyme/saying is self explanatory and a sound advice to the lazy!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Oui Lor Chay E’ni E’ni

(Version in Hokkien)

Oui Lor Chay E’ni E’ni

Sin Ni Tua Tharn Ch’ni

.

(Version in English)

To gather around the steamboat, we need to sit in circles

When the New Year arrives, we would all be busily making money.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This traditional rhyme/saying sounded like a superstition and if one doesn’t follow the rules, bad luck would befall them.  Actually it is just a saying because there is no other way a family can gather around a steamboat if they do not sit round the table!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Khoe Lang Tua

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Khoe Lang Tua

Lang Khoe Lang Lau

.

(Version in English)

People depend on people in daily living

People depend on people in old age.

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About this rhyme/ditty/proverb/saying:~

Like a wise saying, it goes to say that this traditional rhyme/proverb/saying emphasizes the need of people to appreciate others warts and all otherwise who else could we could rely or hope on in the future?

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Kaik Khi Chiak Kar Ki

(Version in Hokkien)

Kaik Khi Chiak Kar Ki

Ay Loon Tharn Kim Toon

.

(Version in English)

If one is stressed, one will regret

Patience brings you richest.

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This traditional rhyme/proverb/saying appeal for patience in handling situations because if one is easily stressed, one would start throwing tantrums, be offensive or do the unthinkable resulting in the loss of opportunity, business or one’s dearest friends. Patience on the other hand reaps rewards!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chit Nor Snar Si Gor

(Version in Hokkien)

Chit Nor Snar Si Gor

Ang Mor Bo Cheng Khor

Huan Nar Nak Oak Cheng Khor

T’ng Lang Toke Chow Bo Lor

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(Version in English)

One. Two, Three, Four, Five

Westerner did not wear his pants

If the Malays were to learn how to wear pants

The Chinese would have no where to go.

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About this rhyme/ditty/proverb/saying:~

This traditional rhyme/ditty/proverb/saying laments the peril of Chinese immigrants who somehow felt that the Westerners did not fulfill their promise at one time and as a consequence, once their Malay counterpart learns how to administrate or stand on their own two feet (hence the expression “to wear pants”) , the Chinese would surely have nowhere to go!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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