AIM

In all civility, men just couldn’t aim properly. That explains why we need to tip toe inside public washrooms.

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misnomer

The notion that big means good in art is but a misnomer. Even when it is more difficult to handle bigger canvases, that does not mean that size alone overwhelms every other factor from color to form to skill to texture etc crucial to what is termed as ‘good art’ worthy to collect. I would urge every artist to understand how to balance canvas size with the subject matter and subject matter relative to the empty spaces. Certain subjects looks better on smaller canvases than on larger ones and certain subjects looks better on print and paper than on canvasses. Because of this many a work became mediocre because certain subjects are either overblown or it went obscure. That is what is termed as proportion. As an extreme example, no one would be fascinated with the imperial faberge eggs if it was made bigger just like the Eiffel Tower would remain obscure if it is one size smaller.

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craftsmen for the courts

When the Italians were churning out sculptures in the hundreds often complaining about the stones brittleness, the Chinese were carving them by the tens of thousands. Many times in soft soapstone, jades, nephrites and in figurines smaller than a foot tall in the greatest of detail. They never complain, they never gain fame. They never have the privilege to inscribe their own name on the works. Often just toiling for long hours working as a craftsmen for the courts.

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ceramic market

As long as excavation never stops, one can never claim to be an accomplished expert in Chinese Ceramics. Only an authority perhaps or a well learnt. It is a vast subject and good things doesn’t come in abundance. As much as one likes to focus on a preferred period, it is already a challenge sorting out the doubtful from the authentic. Everyday in every way, there are constant debates by historians and archaeologists piecing up their findings. Many theories and attribution to kilns had been re written judging by the shards found. Dynasties had also been inserted between other dynasties. Quaintly, one would be surprised that in China auctions, good imitations of genuine copies also has a ready market. So its a whole ball game altogether in the collectors market.

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cultural revolution

During the cultural revolution, Chairman Mao issued a decree to destroy all ideas, culture, tradition, and its way of living. Scholars, literatis, rank and badge officers including shamans were publicly stoked alive and all their precious objects including paintings, cloissones, books, even temples were all torn down and destroyed with. Only a handful of their citizens secretly hide these items by burying them while the rest participated in glory of the rising commander.

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Spanish Silver Dollar

Before the Spanish Silver Dollar became the widely accepted exchange of world currency in the 16th century, every trader trades with currencies of their own country using the weight of the metal as their yardstick. Way before that, tokens were used. Be it in metal, ivory or porcelain very much like today’s gambling chips. These chips were a form of exchange and also a form of wage where producing a token to the bodega rewards one with a fine meal. But way before the tokens, what was used then? There were colorful beads, cowry shells, semi precious stones and metal nuggets some in the shape of animals and fruits, others in the form of canons as well as kettlepots. Well that was the time where barter trading was widely accepted. And when there are no laws to bar certain goods from being traded, especially with Chinese Ceramics, then one cannot claim that every imperial ware that is outside China is stolen. Your law is only enforced after 1970. Since as early as 1200, Chinese fleets have combed the Straits of Malacca.

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