medicated masseurs

~medicated masseurs~ image copyright Kris lee 2012

~medicated masseurs~
image copyright Kris lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Despite the long wait, locals has a quaint attachment to traditional Chinese masseurs rather than those physiotherapists found in hospitals whenever they experience discomforts and pains in their joints. From whence thee treatment came about is anybody’s guess but their endeavor in providing comfort and relief to those in agony is a testimony to their immense popularity. Here, a sitting customer patiently anticipates his turn outside the treatment room where the ‘sinseh’ stations himself while a young disciple gets his relief playing games on a handheld gadget. Picture taken at Jln Samak, Off Federal Cinema, Penang.

~feel good wait~ image copyright Kris lee 2012

~feel good wait~
image copyright Kris lee 2012

~kitchenette of oils~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~kitchenette of oils~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~agony and attestations~ image copyright Kris lee 2012

~agony and attestations~
image copyright Kris lee 2012

.

.

Advertisements

egret below fronds

~egret below fronds~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~egret below fronds~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Migratory birds are many and depending on the species and flyway these birds are accustomed to, Penang is one of the habitual pit stops of these winged ones found scattered along the coastal beaches and mudflats of Tanjung Bungah all the way to Northbeach. Perched under the shades of coconut frond, an Intermediate Egret (Mesophoyx Intermedia) or locally known as ‘Bangau Kerbau’ is spotted in full upright posture looking out towards the unending sea.

~legs of an egret~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~legs of an egret~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

 

As compared to the Great Egret and the Little Egret, they are chiefly identified by their smooth ‘S’ shape neck without kink, a slightly domed head and a gape that ends below the eye. Their legs are generally dark. Picture taken at the coast of Tanjung Bungah, Penang.

.

.

.

Victoria’s Clocktower

~Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee Memorial Clocktower~ image copyright Kris Lee 2013

~Victoria’s Clocktower~
image copyright Kris Lee 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To commemorate Queen Victoria’s 1897 Diamond Jubilee, a Jubilee Clock Tower was erected at King Edward’s Place, at the junction of Light Street and Beach Street, Georgetown, Penang courtesy of  Cheah Chean Eok, a distinguish local Chinese tycoon in the same year. Built in the Moorish style, the tower stands sixty feet tall, one foot for each year of Victoria’s reign. Unfortunately, Queen Victoria never stepped foot on Penang soil which was once a British settlement neither did she live long enough to see the memorial clocktower dedicated to her completed. By the time it was completed in 1902, the queen had died. Picture taken at King Edwards Place, Light Street/Beach Street junction, Penang.

.

.

.

quaint looking postbox

~quaint looking postbox~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~quaint looking postbox~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curiosities never fail to garner audiences and this quaint looking postbox dating back to the Victorian era now joins many others in the list of historical objects once found in abundance on the island. Painted in fire engine red and mounted on a base made of concrete, this 200 year old cast iron ’grand old lady’ still serves the residents up in Penang Hill. Picture taken in Penang Hill, Penang.

.

.

.

Gun Hill Temple

~Gun Hill Temple~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~Gun Hill Temple~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most hindu temples in Penang were built in accordance to the Dravidian discipline, an architectural style found in South India and Sri Aruloli Thirumurugan Temple, better known as the Penang Hill Hindu Temple was no exception. It started off in the 1800′s as a small shrine dedicated to the Hindu deity Murugan by the Indian sepoys and sedan chair carriers and had since grown in size. It is located at the mount within Penang Hill called Gun Hill sharing its site with a Malay mosque. Shown here is one of the ornated cornerpieces found on the roof. Picture taken at Sri Aruloli Thirumurugan Temple, Gun Hill, Penang Hill.

.

.

.

hungry ghost

~hungry ghost~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~hungry ghost~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ‘Hungry Ghost Festival’ happens annually during the seventh month of the Chinese calendar. During this period, traders and residents from the same street or community would collectively raise funds to organize a feast complete with entertainment in the form of traditional puppet or opera shows or the modern version called ‘Ko Tai’ which is a stage performance to appease ‘Tai Su Yeah’ (God of Hades picture above) who is supposedly the deity that protects mortals and these wandering spirits whom were all released from the underworld to roam for one full month.

~other paper effigies~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~other paper effigies~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

There is a marked difference between ancestor worshiping that happens during ‘Cheng Beng’ (All Souls Day) as compared to the Hungry Ghost Festival which is a ritual to appease all ghosts be they young or old but specially to those spirits whom were denied a proper ritual send-off when they die or those whose next of kin and ancestors forgot to pay homage to them in the hope that these lost souls some of whom are out seeking revenge will not disturb them, therefore the term ‘Hungry Ghosts’. Because of this, younger children and adults are taught to observe the strictest of curfews to avoid encountering these roaming spirits.  The food on the altar are for the spirits with ‘Tai Su Yeah’ relishing the offerings first before them, the first few ‘premium’ rows in front of the Ko Tai are reserved for these spirits, and the paper effigies and money are for the spirits.  Superstitious as it is, the Seventh month is also a taboo period for those wanting to tie the knot, move house or kick-start a career as bad luck is said to befall. Exactly midnight on the last day of the festival, the ghosts would return back to their own world as the Gates of Hell closes. The effigy of Tai Su Yeah is then light up in a bonfire alongside the rest of the paper effigies. The leftover food after being consumed by the spirits, would be distributed to the needy. Picture taken at Concordia Road, Pulau Tikus, Penang.

.

.

.

fresh catch

~fresh catch~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~fresh catch~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Traditional livelihood has over the years given way to rapid development and the fishermen at Northbeach, a small promontory behind Ocean Green Seafood Restaurant has also not been spared. For the very few who thrived however, their sampans still brought on fresh catches as fishmongers and restaurateurs await. Picture taken at Northbeach, Jln Sultan Ahmad Shah, Penang.

.

.

.

drop zone

~drop zone~ image copyright Kris Lee 2013

~drop zone~
image copyright Kris Lee 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I don’t know much about photography except that I did learn  composition  from  art

school. I don’t know much about writing because I didn’t do well  in  English  during

school days. I guess there is this unseen hand that shapes our interest through our

life experiences.”

~Kris lee 2013~

lunchbox meal

~lunchbox meal~ image copyright Kris lee 2012

~lunchbox meal~
image copyright Kris lee 2012

Lunch is an important meal to local folks. To the lesser fortunate, having a simple lunchbox meal is indeed a blessing courtesy of some religious societies which made it their daily affair to donate food. Sitting at the temple courtyard annexed to a shaded shrine, temple devotees were also seen going about performing their customary rites in the hope that their prayers would eventually be answered. Ballets of roof tiles supposedly to be used for the ongoing renovation were seen parked at the forefront. Picture taken at the Goddess of Mercy Temple, Jln Masjid Kapitan Keling, Penang.

.

.

.

bird’s nest fern

~bird's nest fern~ image copyright Kris Lee 2012

~bird’s nest fern~
image copyright Kris Lee 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bird’s Nest Fern, supposedly of the species ‘Asplenium Nidus’ grow well in the tropics under warm humid conditions in areas partial to full shade. Their fronds are a characteristic light green in color, often crinkled at the edges with a black midrib lined with spores forming in clusters at the underside and they are often found attached on the branches and trunks of trees, the result of bird’s droppings laden with seeds that the birds consume. Each of these fronds (similar to banana leaves) called ‘lamina’ can grow up to 150 cm in length. These two giants are spotted some 15 meters off the ground where the huge tree stood. Picture taken at Persiaran Kuari, Penang.

.

.

.