Chay Sien Khiar Sien

(Version in Hokkien)

Chay Sien

Khiar Sien

Thnia Hood Keng

Thnia Liow

Hor Lang

Eh Sim Cheng Cheng

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(Version in English)

Sitting meditation

Standing meditation

Listening to the mantra chants

As one listens

It makes one

Feel at peace!

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About this rhyme:~

This is a  rhyme promoting one aspect of  Buddhist philosophy and that is the virtue of meditation which brings about attainable peace.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ang Mor Chiak Bak

(Version in Hokkien)

Ang Mor Chiak Bak

Lu Chiak Kut

Ang Mor Pangsai

Lu Khi Put!

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(Version in English)

The westerners eat meat

You eat bones

When the westerners shit

You need to scoop!

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About this rhyme:~

This is a  rhyme that expresses disgust over the Westerners perhaps because of the centuries of Colonial ruling in olden day Malaya where the locals were being treated unfairly! Later this rhyme grew to show disgust over English educated locals by the ethnic school children who are envious of them for not being able to communicate in English themselves.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ah Ch’eng Ah Ch’eng

(Version in Hokkien)

Ah Ch’eng, Ah Ch’eng

Tua Liap Leng

Gu Sio Tark

Beh Sio Ch’eng

Ch’eng Lai, Ch’eng Khi

Ch’eng Tiok Nor Liap Leng.

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(Version in English)

Ah Ch’eng Ah Ch’eng

With big buxoms

The cows step on each other

The horses were fighting

Exchanging punches here to there

Until they accidentally punched the two buxoms!

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About this rhyme:~

This is a  tall tale rhyme about two people in a row with the poor women being punched in her breasts. Presumably it is a lovers quarrel.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lau Ah Pek

(Version in Hokkien)

Lau Ah Pek

Chua Wa Khi Thak Chek

A, B, C,

Sinseh Thau Chiak Kali

Wa Phak Lu 

Lu Phak Ee

Wa Sayang Lu

Lu Sayang Ee.

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(Version in English)

Old man

Brought me to school

A, B, C,

The teacher stole some curry

I beat you

You beat her

I love you

You love him.

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About this rhyme:~

This is a  schooltime teaser rhyme recited by children while playing.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Gia Hniau Gia Keh Keh

(Version in Hokkien)

Gia Hniau Gia Keh Keh

Kh’uai Kh’uai Cho Lau Peh

Gia Hniau Gia Kuan Kuan

Kh’uai Kh’uai Cho Chong Guan.

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(Version in English)

When the joss sticks are held low

One would soon become a father

When the joss sticks are held high

One would soon become a high official!

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This is a  rhyme recited by the “Sang Keh Mm” (Mistress of Ceremony) with the wish for the bridegroom to be blessed with great success and lots of children.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Char Bor Bo Ch’eng

(Version in Hokkien)

Char Bor Bo Ch’eng

Siang Ka Ong Lai

Thai Cho Nor Peng.

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(Version in English)

A flirtatious woman

Is like a pineapple

Split into two!

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This is a  rhyme/saying sought to tell the listener of some flirtatious women in the act of betrayal. In this instance a pineapple known for its sweet taste but sometimes bites our tongue is used to describe the relationship.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ah Kong Bo Looi Ah Kong Oo Looi

(Version in Hokkien)

Ah Kong Bo Looi

Chang Aik Chap Tau Pun Ch’au

Knia Soon Pun Ow

Ah Kong Oo Looi

Chang Aik Bo Chit Air

Knia Soon Kooi Tua Air!

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(Version in English)

If your grandpa is poor

He would still be smelly even if he bathe ten times

And his grandchildren would also smell stale

But if your grandpa is rich

And he bathes not even close to a fifth of a second

His grandchildren would still surround him!

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This is a  rhyme/saying sought to tell the listener of the sad realities in life where money indeed could buy relations.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chit Chieu Phak Nor Chieu Ch’eng

(Version in Hokkien)

Chit Chieu Phak

Nor Chieu Ch’eng

Ch’eng Lai, Ch’eng Khi

Ch’eng Kar Tai Siang Loh Koon

Chau Khi Ah Phien Keng!

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(Version in English)

One hand beat

Two hands box

Exchanging blows from here to there

Box till their guardian deity

Ran to the opium den!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This is a  rhyme/ditty that describes the seriousness of having a fight till the guardian spirit could even turn the other away. An opium den in those days is  place where addicts laze all day long without a care for the outside world hence in this instance it is apt to say their own deity would choose to withdraw his blessing and ignore them and they would be left unguarded if they choose to carry on fighting.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chay It Char

(Version in Hokkien)

Chay It, Char

Chay Jee, Char

Chay Snar, Bo Sniar Kua

Chay Si, Khoon Ka Par!

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(Version in English)

First day, wake up early

Second day, wake up early

Third day, not much noise

Fourth day, sleep soundly!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This is a Chinese New Year rhyme/ditty. ‘Chay It’ means the 1st day of Chinese New Year, ‘Chay Jee’ means the 2nd day of Chinese New Year and so on and so forth. And after the first and second day of visiting and entertaining, the host will rest on the third day thence sleeping soundly on the fourth.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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