Kiau Bo Puak

(Version in Hokkien)

Kiau Bo Puak

Looi Tharn Bay Khnuar Uak

Kiau Na Puak

Si Ka Kh’nua Uak!

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(Version in English)

If one doesn’t gamble

All the money earned is meaningless

But when one gambles

It is more meaningful if one is dead!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty is a gambler’s own consolation and self reassurance to continue.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ai Ai Bay Kiam Chai

(Version in Hokkien)

Ai Ai

Bay Kiam Chai

Sio Sio, Chit Ouar Lai

Leng Leng

Gua Mm Mai!

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(Version in English)

Ai Ai

Selling salted vegetables

Hot hot, bring me a bowl

Cold cold

Then I do not want it!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty is a teaser aimed at a lady named Ai Ai. The word ‘Leng Leng’ is a pun which could either mean ‘cold’ or ‘breast’.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chiu Ow Gia Kuan Kuan

(Version in Hokkien)

Chiu Ow Gia Kuan Kuan

Kniar Soon Cho Chong Guan

Chiu Ow Gia Keh Keh

Meh Ni Cho Lau Peh

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(Version in English)

Raise your drinking glasses

Your descendants would become Court Officials

Holding your drinking glasses low

You would be a father by next year!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty is usually recited by the master of ceremony when toasting in a wedding function with a wish that the married couple would be blessed with successful children.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chow Mek Kar Niau Mi

(Version in Hokkien)

Chow Mek Kar Niau Mi

Ka Kah Ngiang Ngiang How!

Lau Ah Po Heng Chua Ji

Heng Kah Ngiang Ngiang How!

Bak Sart Teng Kachuak

Kachuak Bok Bok Thiau

Bak Sart Si Khiau Khiau!

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(Version in English)

A grasshopper bit the kitten

The kitten cried out loud!

An old women pays her debts

Pay till she cried out loud!

A lice stung the cockroach

The cockroach jumps in a frenzy

The lice dies!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty came about to keep children entertained/distracted perhaps during bathing time when the water in the morning is so cold!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chit Snua Koay Chit Snua

(Version in Hokkien)

Chit Snua Koay Chit Snua

Chuay Bo Niau Knia Lai Kow Suar.

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(Version in English)

Crossing one hill over another

Couldn’t find a rightful kitten to woo.

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty screams of the anguish of a lonely heart in search of a suitor!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Puak Kiu

(Version in Hokkien)

Puak Kiu, Kiu Tiok Ai Liak

Puak Beh, Beh Tiok Ai Chiak

Puak Kor Phiok, Lang Tiok Ai Oo Giak.

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(Version in English)

In football betting, one must place stakes

In horse betting, the horse needs to eat

In buying shares, one must have sufficient capital.

Is out wandering !

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying emphasizes the need of capital in all kinds of investment.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Poot Hau Ay Sim Poo

(Version in Hokkien)

Poot Hau Ay Sim Poo

Snar Twni Sio

Oo Hau Ay Chow Wa

Pnua Lor Eo!

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(Version in English)

The unfilial daughter-in-law

Keeps the daily three meals warm

Whereas her own filial daughter

Is out wandering !

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About this rhyme/saying:~

Life is full of contradictions. This rhyme/saying describes the sad state of affairs in some families whee an old mother needs to depend on her unfilial daughter-in-law for her three meals when her own daughter do not give much thought to her welfare.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Tiau Hwa

(Version in Hokkien)

Tiau Kooi Na Pak

Toe Bay Bong Tiok Bak

Tiau Kooi Na Cheng

Toe Bay Bong Tiok Leng!

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(Version in English)

To give away hundred dollars worth of garlands

Doesn’t mean you are allowed to touch her flesh

To give away thousand dollars worth of garlands

Doesn’t mean you are allowed to touch her breast!

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying is rather crude but advises patrons especially those who frequent night clubs to be prudent in spending when lavishing performers with costly garlands..

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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