Cantik Si Sooi

(Version in Hokkien)

Cantik Si Sooi

Hantu Si Kooi!

.

(Version in English)

Cantik means pretty

Hantu means ghost!

.

About the Rhyme:~

This rhyme teases damsels who were overly coiffured and applied too much of ‘bedak sejuk’ (a local rice-based moisturising cake) on their faces that makes them look as pale as ghost. The words “cantik” and “hantu” is in Malay meaning “pretty” and “ghost” respectively.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

 

Hokkien Lang

(Version in Hokkien)

Teochew Lang

Khar Chwni Ang Ang

Hokkien Lang

Bo Hai Lang

Kong Hu Lang

Kha Chwni Sneh Thang!

.

(Version in English)

Teochew people

Flush buttocks

Hokkien people

Never causes harm

Cantonese people

Backside grows worms!

.

About the Rhyme:~

This rhyme describes the difference between these three distinct groups of Chinese that landed in old Penang- the Teochews, Hokkiens and Cantonese. More often than not this rhyme causes others to chuckle when uttered.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Sim Pu Teh

(Version in Hokkien)

Sim Pu Teh Tiok Ai Lim

Lim Ka Liow Barn Barn Thoon

Meh Ni Siang Ch’ew Phoe Soon

Chit Pnua Ay Soon Ay Cho Seng Lee

Chit Pnua Ay Soon Ay Cho Loh Koon

Oo Looi Toke Bay Masli

Bo Looi Toke Bay Datsun!

.

(Version in English)

Tea served by the daughter-in-law, one must drink

Slowly but surely one must fnish it

By next year both hands would have carried a grandchild

Half of the grandchildrens are businessman

While the other half are doctors

When one is rich buy a Mercedes

If one is poorer buy a Datsun!

.

About the Rhyme:~

This is a  rhyme recited by the Mistress of Ceremony (Sang Keh Mm) wishing upon the parents of the wedded couple bountiful blessings for able descendants.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Oo Hau Bo Hau

(Version in Hokkien)

Oo Hau Ay Chow Wa Cho Koay

Bo Hau Ay Chow Wa Poon Keh Huay

Oo Hau Ay Knia Sai Pai Snar Pie

Bo Hau Ay Knia Sai Si Ang Mor Phai!

.

(Version in English)

Filial daughters bake cakes

Unfilial daughters divides fortune

Filial sons bow thee times to pay respect

Unfilial sons are the Western educated ones!

.

About the Rhyme:~

This is a  rhyme describing how marriages to Westerners are more than often frowned upon.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Koay E’ni

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Ay E’ni

Lu Ay P’ni

Lang Ay Ang

Lu Ay Peh

Kau Tay Lu Ay Si Ang

Ar Si Peh?

.

(Version in English)

Ours is round

Yours is flat

Ours is Red

Yours is white

Actually yors is Red

Or is it white?

.

About the Rhyme:~

This is a Childrens’ rhyme heard during the Winter Solstice Festival which is a month before the Chinese New Year. These round glutinous rice balls are a sweet served in many colors but predominantly the colors are red and white. This soup is also served to couples during their wedding ceremony.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.