Kniar Choon Chin Kharn Khor

(Version in Hokkien)

Kniar Choon Chin Kharn Khor

Siew Hong Ka Siew Hor

Chiak Moy Phuay Chai Por

Khiam Chni LAi CHua Bor!

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(Version in English)

It is not easy to be a sailor

Being exposed to wind and rain

Eating porridge with preserved radish

Saving every single cent to get married!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty describes the hardship of a Chinese sailor.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Liew Liew Siau

(Version in Hokkien)

Liew Liew Siau

Boe Kian Siau!

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(Version in English)

Shame on you

Who doesn’t know shame!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty is always used on children to deter them from running everywhere whenever adults put on their clothes for them and if they do, it is also recited to make them come back!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Thau Ni Sim Pu

(Version in Hokkien)

Thau Ni, Sim Pu

Jee Ni, Sai Hu

Snar Ni, Wak Wak Tu

Si Ni, Lu Choot Chu!

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(Version in English)

First year, daughter-in-law

Second year, an accomplished expert

Third year, started talking back

Fourth year, mother-in-law got to leave the house!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty reflects on the habits of some daughter-in-laws.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Thni Or Or

(1st Version in Hokkien)

Thni Or Or

Buek Loke Hor

Lau Ah Mm

Khi Say Khor

Lau Ah Kong

Khi Kut Oar

Kut Tiok Buaya Hoo, Goh Poon Goh

Ah Kong Korng Buek Thai

Ah Mm Kong Chu Gulai!

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(1st Version in English)

The sky was dark

It was about to rain

Old nanny

Went to wash some trousers

Old grandpa

Went digging for yam

But dug out a five pounds five ounces crocodile instead

Old grandpa says he decided to kill it

Old granny says to cook it in curry!

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

Thni Or Or

Ai Loke Hor

Ah Kong Chau Bo lor

Ah Mah Chuay Ah Kong

Ah Kong Gau Pek Chang

Ah Mah Chuay Bo lang!

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(2nd Version in English)

The sky was dark

It was about to rain

Grandpa could not escape it

Grandma looks for grandpa

But grandpa hid himself up on the tree

So grandma did not find him!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty is meaningless but is recited each time stormy clouds appear. The Hokkien word “Ai” and “Buek” in both versions has the same meaning.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Thoo Lu Ku Lau Kau Hee

(Version in Hokkien)

Thoo Lu Ku

Ji Chap Si

Huan Na Kak

Pnuar Kau Hee

Pneh Teng Peng

Lau Kau Lin Tok Teng

Tok Teng Khiau

Lau Kau Si Khiau Khiau!

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(Version in English)

Baldy, Baldy

On the twenty fourth

At the Esplanade

There was a monkey stunt show

When the stage collapse

The monkey rolled down the table

The table went off balanced

And the monkey died!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty is a tale that gradually became an advice to hyperactive children with tendencies to misbehave.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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