Thor Chai Thor Thor

(Version in Hokkien)

Thor Chai Thor Thor

Ow Kuay Chuey Bo Bor

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(Version in English)

A protuding belly button

In the future, it will be difficult for you to find a wife!

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About this ditty:~

This ditty teases one who possesses protruding belly buttons. It was indeed common in those days, the result of careless doctors or midwives who delivers the baby.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Tua Thow Li Kong Chooi

(1st Version in Hokkien)

Tua Thow Li Kong Chooi

Gow Chiak Gow Pang Phooi

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(1st Version in English)

A big head with thunderous mouth

Has a good appetite and a frequent farter!

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

Tua Thow Li Kong Chooi

Eh Chiak Bay Pang Phooi

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(2nd Version in English)

A big head with thunderous mouth

Has a good appetite but couldn’t fart!

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About this ditty:~

The second version criticizes someone who is good at shouting and eating but useless when it comes to simple chores unlike the first version which is contrary.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ni Nor Ni Nor Keng

(Version in Hokkien)

Ni Nor Ni Nor Keng

Sin Niau Jib Pang Keng

Kniar Sai Thau Bong Leng!

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(Version in English)

Ni Nor Ni Nor Keng( the sound of clashing cymbals)

The bride enters the chamber

The bridegroom molested her breast!

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About this ditty:~

This is a ditty teasing newly weds!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Pang Phooi

(Version in Hokkien)

Eh Tarn Eh Phooi Bay Chau

Eh Chau Eh Phooi Bay Tarn

Tapi Sinseh Eh Phooi

Eh Tarn Ko Chau!

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(Version in English)

Loud farts aren’t stinky

Stinky farts aren’t loud

But a teachers fart

Are both stinky yet loud!

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About this ditty:~

This is a naughty ditty cheeky students dedicated it to their teachers!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Pai Khar

(Version in Hokkien)

Pai Khar, Pai EoEo

Khi Snuar, Thow Barn Keo

Lang Khnuar Tiok, Keh Pang Jio

Lang Liak Tiok, Ai Ai Kio!

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(Version in English)

Crippled with legs that sway

Went uphill to steal egg plants

When people are watching him, he pretended to urinate

When caught, he wails in pain!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty is a teaser. Sad but true that cripples were also made subjects in ditties.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Bak Sai Chiam

(Version in Hokkien)

Bak Sai Chiam

Bak Sai Poe

Ai Ee Arsi Ai Swee

Tim Lu Loke Chwee

Ch’it Cheng Ni Khee

Ch’it Barn Ni Mm Thang Twni!

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(Version in English)

Pointed eye stye

Granny eye stye

Do you want it or would you rather be beautiful?

Throw you into the water

And said away for seven thousand years

Never to reappear again even after seventy thousand years!

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 About this rhyme/ditty:~

This ditty is recited when one afflicted with ‘eye stye’ had it removed. The process of removing it is done with a rice grain used to prick the stye. Seven times with seven grains, each time immediately discarding the grain into the water hoping that stye would never reappear again in one’s lifetime!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ch’ow Sim Knuar

(Version in Hokkien)

Ch’ow Sim Knuar

Nua T’ng Ar Tor

Mm Si Chay It

Tok Chay Gor

Ow Buay Choot Snuar

Khi Tuar Hong

Loke Tua Hor!

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(Version in English)

Bad hearted

Hope your intestines would rot

If not the 1st day

then the 15th day of the month

Before the hearse leaves

Strong wind will blow

And heavy rain would befall!

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 About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty is a curse intended for the bad hearted.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ch’i Chiow Keh Hoay Liow

(Version in Hokkien)

Ch’i Chiow 

Keh Hoay Liow

Ch’i Hu

Keh Hoay Pu!

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(Version in English)

Rear birds

Fortune drained

Rear fishes

Fortune multiplies!

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 About this rhyme/ditty:~

This is a rhyme/ditty is a superstition rather to discourage bird rearing.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chiak Par Khoon

(Version in Hokkien)

Chiak Par Khoon

Tarn Ji Oon

Khoon Par Chiak

Tarn Ho Giak!

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(Version in English)

After eating, sleep

Waiting for fate

After sleeping, eat

Waiting to be rich!

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 About this rhyme/ditty:~

This is a rhyme/ditty about lazy people in the hope of striking it rich without working!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Gua Si Kong Chu Kong

(Version in Hokkien)

Gua Si “Kong Chu Kong” Eh Peng

Ch’niar Chieu Thnar

Toe Chieu Ch’eng

Ow Khar Thart Lu Si Teng Teng!

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(Version in English)

I am “Confucius” soldier

Right hand block

Left hand punch

Hind leg kick you to death!

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 About this ditty:~

This is a ditty that children recite when they were play acting while mimicking a famous Chinese personality named “Confucius” who is regarded by many, even worshipped as a wise sage.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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