Leng Chee

(Version in Hokkien)

Leng Chee Chneh

Keh Ni Neh

Leng Chee Ang

Mm But Lang

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(Version in English)

While the lychees are still green

You are very hospitable

After the lychees ripen

You forget everybody!

 

About this rhyme:~

This rhyme describes insincere people.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Gong Lang

(Version in Hokkien)

Gong Lang, Gong Tai Tai

Si Liau, Bo Lang Chai

Lang Kong Tang, Ee Kong Sai!

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(Version in English)

Stupid person, really stupid

When he is dead, no one would know

When people talk about this, he is talking about that!

 

About this rhyme/ditty:~

This rhyme/ditty is similar to “Tor Pui” except for some words. It pokes fun at ignorant people and i meant as a teaser said in jest!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Gau Seng

(Version in Hokkien)

Seng Niau, Pek Chau

Seng Knia, Put Hau

Seng Khit Chiak, Tata Jit Kau!

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(Version in English)

Pamper the cat, climbs up the stove

Pamper the child, and they would turn out to be unfilial

Pamper the beggar, and he would come everyday!

 

About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This rhyme/proverb/saying is a lesson to all.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Nya Ah Nya

(Version in Hokkien)

Nya Ah Nya

Tit tit Knia

Mm Tharng Peng Lai Khnua Ah Ba

Ah Ba Khnua Liau Tiok Ch’neh Kniar

Eow Sorm Ko-lay Chiak Beh Knia

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(Version in English)

Miss Oh Miss

Just walk straight ahead

And don’t look back

The sight of me might frighten you off

No Herbs would be able to cure you!

 

About this rhyme:~

This rhyme is a teaser used at young maidens(Nyonya’s or Ah Nya in this case) who were caught peeking at young men(Ah Ba). Unknown to many, young maidens in the Chinese household of yesteryears are confined to the house only to go out once a year during the 15th moon of our Lunar New Year. Except those from their own family, the sight of young men are pretty rare.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Khiap Si Lang

(Version in Hokkien)

Khiap Si Lang

Ai Chiok Kniar

Phai Mia Lang

Ai Kh’nua Mia

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(Version in English)

Ugly people

Likes looking at the mirror

Poor people

Likes to have their palm read.

 

About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying expresses one’s wishes. To the ugly, looking at the mirror is a reassurance about their image. To those who lead a hard life, consulting a palmist would help them keep watch over future catastrophes that might befall them and finding answers to life’s happenings.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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