Part Tor Cheng

(Version in Hokkien)

Ang Ka Bor

Pai Lark Lay Pai

Khi Snua Teng

Twni Lai Part Tor Cheng

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(Version in English)

Husband and wife

Saturday and Sunday

Go to the countryside

Came home pregnant.

 

About this rhyme:~

This rhyme is a teaser guaranteed to put a smile on one’s face!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Sin Chnia Si

(Version in Hokkien)

Sin Chnia Si

Oui Lor Chay E’ni E’ni

Chiak E’ni E’ni

Tharn Tua Ch’ni

Chiak Juak Juak

Tharn Lau Juak

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(Version in English)

During the New Year season

Gather around the steamboat

Eating together at the round table

Would reward us a fortune

Eating warm food

Is how we enjoy!

 

About this rhyme:~

This rhyme is recited during Chinese New Year and it carries a special blessing for everyone gathered at the round table to be prosperous, happy and lots of fun!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Sun Kiew Kiew

(Version in Hokkien)

Sun Kiew Kiew

Heh Bo Chiew

Chia Kay Bah

Oon Tow Eu

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(Version in English)

Skinny fellow,

Prawns without whiskers!

Eating chicken meat

With soy sauce

 

About this rhyme/ditty:~

Similar to “Liew Liew Liew“, Sun Kiew Kiew is also heard in street games when we laugh at others shameful silliness, all in the name of fun!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Sin Thau Phark Snar Eh

(Version in Hokkien)

Sin Thau

Phark Snar Eh

Ku Thau

Si Lau Peh

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(Version in English)

Newly cut hair

Hit three times

Untrimmed hair

Death of your father.

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About this Rhyme:~

This rhyme comes in two separate parts. The first two lines is actually a teaser complimenting one’s newly hair cut and the second, which is seldom uttered is an unpleasant  retort . During my younger days, there were certainly many occasions where this rhyme was heard in school where unsuspected victims were hit on the head unaware by classmates as they recite this rhyme.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Teng Teng Teng

(Version in Hokkien)

Teng Teng Teng

Gia Hoo Teng

Lang Lang Lang

Liak Sien Tharng

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(Version in English)

Lanterns lanterns lanterns

Carry fish-shaped lanterns

People people people

Catching salamanders..

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About this Rhyme:~

This is a rhyme tied with the Lantern Festival. Meaningless but lively, catching salamanders as mentioned isn’t a favorite past time of our forefathers in fact, most regarded them as household pest just like cockroaches! Throughout the Han Dynasty (206 BC-AD 220), Buddhism flourished in China. One emperor on hearing that Buddhist monks would watch ‘sarira’, or remains from the cremation of Buddha’s body, then light lanterns to worship Buddha on the 15th day of the 1st lunar month, he ordered lanterns to be lighted in the imperial palace and temples, to pay homage to Buddha which eventually caught on with his subjects then, throughout the country and the world.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Aim Choon Choon

(Version in Hokkien)

Aim Choon Choon

Char Bee Hoon

Aim Bo Choon

Tua Si Poon

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(Version in English)

Aim carefully

Fry rice vermicelli

Aim not accurately

Loses greatly..

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About this Rhyme/Ditty:~

This is a modern rhyme/ditty urging everyone to be as accurate as possible in all that we are tasked to do.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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