missing vocabulary

Men  would  have  loved  better  if  they  could  read   the   minds

of women and  women  could  have  loved  better  if  they  could

understand  the  ways  of  men   but   that   all   said,  this  world

would be a sad place if words like skirmish, misunderstanding,

jealousy and anticipation are all  missing  from  our  vocabulary.

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intermediary

My dad was a  Taoist but my  mom buried  him  a  Buddhist.

My mom was a  Buddhist but my sis buried her a  Christian.

And  as  if   that  is  not  complicated  enough,  I   have    had

dreams of  related  and  unrelated  souls  asking  for  favors

during our  ‘Cheng Beng  Season’  (Chinese All Souls Day)

which I appease after  much  discernment  though  I  am  no

Buddhist nor Taoist.  I lead a life of kindness and fervour but

how I wish those souls do not seek me out nor  root  me  as

their intermediary between earth and nowhere.

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Soli Bangali

(Version in Hokkien)

Soli Bangali

Ma Chai Chay Loli

Loli Peng

Kha Chwni Cheng

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(Version in English)

Sorry Bengali

Tomorrow go ride on a lorry

The lorry capsized

Our buttocks get swollen!

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This kiddy rhyme/saying is meaningless but fun to recite. It generally trails right after someone says sorry to you and it is not used in teasing others. “Bengali” in this rhyme refers to the settlers from Bengal, India.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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