Lu Khnua Wa, Wa Khnua Lu

(Version in Hokkien)

Lu Khnua Wa Ho

Wa Khnua Lu Ho

Sim Lai Huan Lo

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Lu Khnua Wa Gau

Wa Khnua Lu Gau

Nor Lay Huan Chu Thau

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Lu Khnua Wa Ho Giak

Wa Khnua Lu Ho Giak

Nor Lay Ar Si Chay’ng Khar Khiak

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Lu Khnua Wa Chnua

Wa Khnua Lu Chnua

Nor Lay Bo Ai Uwa

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Lu Khnua Wa Lau

Wa Khnua Wa Lau

Nor Lay Peh Chap Ar Buay Kau

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Lu Khnuar Wa Phnai

Wa Khnua Lu Phnai

Tu Tiok Bo Ai Ch’ai

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Lu Khnua Wa Ay

Wa Khnua Lu Ay

Ai Bin Bay Phai Say

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Lu Khnua Wa Beng

Wa Khnua Beng

NOr Lay Ar Si Kay Bo Heng

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Lu Khnua Wa Swee

Wa Khnua Lu Swee

Swee Ka Hna Tiok Kwee

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Lu Khnua Wa Tai

Wa Khnua Lu Tai

Ho Kuay Lang Bebai

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(Version in English)

You think I am doing well

I think you are doing well

But both are worried sick!

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You think I am clever

I think you are clever

But both are potato heads!

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You think I am rich

I think you are rich

But both of us are still wearing clogs

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You think I am proud

I think you are proud

We both shun one another

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You think I am old

I think you are old

But both of us haven’t reach eighty!

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You think I am evil

I think you are evil

Ignoring each other when we meet

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You think I am capable

I think you are capable

Boastful and thick skinned we both are

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You think I am brave

I think you are brave

But we are both cowards

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You think I am pretty

I think you are pretty

Pretty till we scare the ghosts easily

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You think I am foolish

I think you are foolish

But at least both of us are not snobbish!

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About this Rhyme/Saying:~

This is perhaps the and most entertaining and comical of all the Hokkien Rhymes. It speaks of persona and how it conceals reality and affects the impression others have of you. The word “bebai” means “snobbish” or “to be aloof when interacting with others”.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Oo Lang Khnua Looi Aneh Tang

(Version in Hokkien)

Oo Lang Khnua Looi Aneh Tang

Giar Lai Chni Loh Khang, Ah Si Siew Ti Ang

Chit Looi Pian Nor Looi, Siew Ka Kooi Tua Tooi

Chay Lai Siong Ee Pun Sim Khnua Khooi

Oo Si Phoe Lai Chiak

Oo Si Larm Lai Khoon

Thniar Tiok Lang Ay Ch’u Jip Ch’art, Khar Chiew Choon

Mm Bart Thnia Kong Hiam Looi Chay

Jit Si Um Meh Tooi Ka Chay

Mm Bart Kong Chit Lay Looi La Sarm

Long Kow Khiok Khi Lai Tarm Tarm

Na Si Looi Puak Loak Khi Sampah Thang

Khar Kin Khiok Khi Lai Bay Sai Pang

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(Version in English)

There are those who are obsessed with money

Hoarding it in dug up grounds, or in stoneware vessels

One cent multiply to two, hoarding and piling it up

Sitting and staring at it appeases their heart and senses

Sometimes they cradle it in their arms when they are having a meal

Sometimes they hug it to sleep

When they hear about a house break-in, their hands and feet would also shiver

Never do they ever say they have enough

Day and night they hope to earn some more

Never have they thought that money is dirty

Even when they were picked up from the drain

If the money were to drop into the trash bin

It would be instantly salvaged by all means!

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About this Rhyme/Saying:~

This Hokkien Rhyme/Saying speaks about money and how certain types of people are so obsessed with it.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Peh Hoon Sien

(Version in Hokkien)

Peh Hoon Sien, Tiam Tiam Khi Gien

Kha Charm Soak Ah Phien

Lang Sien Sien, Thau Lien Lien

Tisi Ay Kai Pien

Khar Tang Tang, Bak Chew Ang Ang

Tisi Ka Sniau Buek Pang

Arn Chnua Cho Lang Ay Aneh Gong

Siang Ka Sang Khi Karm Loh Bong

Kharn Kharn Khor Khor Peh Bo Ch’i

Tong Kim Lu Khi Hai Ka Ki

Nor Lay Kong Tiok Nah Ow Tni

Tui Ee Lang Mana Kuay Ay Khi

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(Version in English)

Heroin addict, regularly you are in fits

Worse than the opium addicts

Always lethargic, head never stop swirling

When then can you repent?

Your leg feels heavy, your eyes are bloodshot

When then would you be able to let it go?

Why are you so foolish?

It is as if you are already inside the grave

Your parents raised you up in all hardship

But today you are ruining yourself

Both your parents cannot accept this fact

So how could you treat them so heartlessly?

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About this Rhyme:~

This is a Hokkien Rhyme/Saying about the dangers of  heroin addiction. This rhyme is self explained.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Long Ee Long Toak

(Version in Hokkien)

Long Ee Long Toak

Khui Ch’wooi Luan Chu Choak

Mm Sai Aneh Tau

Aneh Bo Kio Gau

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(Version in English)

Bang chairs bang tables

Cursing as he opens his mouth

One needn’t be arrogant nor proud

This is not what we call clever!

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About this Rhyme/Saying:~

This is a Hokkien Rhyme/Saying. It advises one to refrain from displaying their agitation because there are better ways to resolve issues, disputes or problems.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Mm Knar Khui Bak Chiu

(Version in Hokkien)

Mm Knar Khui Bak Chiu

Bin Kaik Ka Eu Eu

Pang Ay Ch’ut, Kui Lang Song

Pang Bay Ch’ut, Kio Tolong

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(Version in English)

Dare not open his eyes

Frowning up his face

What a relieve when his stools appear

Crying for help when it did not!

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About this Rhyme:~

This is a grose Hokkien Rhyme. It describes one’s toilet business in a jest.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Puak Kiau Kooi

(Version in Hokkien)

Puak Kiau Kooi

Looi Khi Bay Toak T’wni

Puak Tua Kiau

Su Ka Liau Liau Liau

Khiam Lang Looi

Char Khi Um Meh Hor Lang Tooi

Sniau Bay Khooi

Sor Buay Thiau Tham Phooi

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(Version in English)

Addicted gambler

Your money went and never return

Big time gambling

Loses everything

Owing people money

Letting people chase after you day and night

When there is no way out

In the end you jumped into the spittoon!

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About this Rhyme:~

This Hokkien Rhyme warns about the danger of gambling and how one may lose one’s fortune if one is engrossed in this unhealthy habit.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Khar Ch’nui Ang Ang

(Version in Hokkien)

Khar Ch’nui Ang Ang

Pang Phui Phang Phang

Thau Khak Hang Hang

Thau Mor Chang Chang

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(Version in English)

Crimson buttocks

Sweet scented flatulence

Feverish head

Hair stood on end!

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About this Rhyme:~

This is yet another meaningless Hokkien Rhyme recited to past time to amuse oneself or the company one is in.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ah Ko Bay Ark Nooi

(Version in Hokkien)

Ah Ko Bay Ark Nooi

Ah So Bay Tharm Phooi

Ah Tniau Gau Pang Phooi

Ah Kor Chuan Tua Khooi

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(Version in English)

Brother in law sells duck eggs

Sister in law sells spittoons

Mom’s brother in law farts excessively

Dad’s sister sighs away her displeasure!

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About this Rhyme:~

This is a meaningless Hokkien Rhyme.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Tua Sniar Po

(Version in Hokkien)

Tua Sniar Po, Loh Phoe So

Gia Hor Snuar, Kh’ui Chit Pnuar

Cheng Salung, Cheng Kuantay ay

Khnuar Tiok Hami, Mm Kam Bay

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(Version in English)

Loud-mouthed lady, went a-roaming in town

Holding a half opened parasol

Wearing her sarong, and her heels

Whatever she is eyeing, she dare not buy!

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About this Rhyme:~

This Hokkien Rhyme pokes fun at a certain loud-mouthed lady all clad in fashionable “nyonya” attire and seen roaming the streets. There is no hidden meaning to this rhyme.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Sampat Ee Sampat Thong

(Version in Hokkien)

Sampat Ee Sampat Thong

Ai Ka Lang Luan Chu Kong

Aneh Gong Tua Tai

Ha Lang Ch’io Ka Mm Chai

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(Version in English)

Aged aunties are erratic

Loves to spread rumours

Why are they so foolish

Aren’t they aware they are being ridiculed?

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About this Rhyme/Saying:~

This Hokkien Rhyme/Saying describes the traits of certain people who went about gossiping without realizing the consequences of their actions.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Suka Ka Kuay Thow Jip Sim

(Version in Hokkien)

Suka Ka Kuay Thow Jip Sim

Tui Bay Tiok Sor Khi Siow Kin

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(Version in English)

Being so seriously devoted

When not reciprocated, became delirious.

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About this Rhyme/Proverb/Saying:~

This Hokkien Rhyme/Proverb/Saying describes the ways of some people who cannot accept no for an answer when it comes to courtship.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Niau Jin Ch’u

(Version in Hokkien)

Niau Jin Ch’u

Bo Jin Ch’u Choo

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(Version in English)

A cat recognizes it’s home

Rather than the owner of the house it resided upon.

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About this Rhyme/Proverb/Saying:~

This Hokkien Rhyme/Proverb/Saying makes one aware that there are certain classes of people that knows not what gratefulness is.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Knia Kiam Kor Kniar Phnai Lor

(Version in Hokkien)

Knia Kiam Kor

Kniar Phnai Lor

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(Version in English)

When children are not attended to

They will end up in the wrong path.

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About this Rhyme/Proverb/Saying:~

This Hokkien Rhyme/Proverb/Saying speaks about the importance of parents devoting their time, care and attention towards their kids so that they would walk the correct path.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chiak Ka Por Lau Lai Cho Chor

(Version in Hokkien)

Chiak Ka Por

Lau Lai Cho Chor

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(Version in English)

To eat healthily

Ensures longevity.

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About this Rhyme/Proverb/Saying:~

This Hokkien Rhyme/Proverb/Saying talks about preserving one’s vitality well into the old age through the regular consumption of traditional herbs and medicines to boost one’s immunity.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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