Bo Geh Chiak Tau Geh

(Version in Hokkien)

Bo Geh Chiak Tau Geh

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(Version in English)

No teeth eat bean sprouts.

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About this rhyme:~

This rhyme pokes fun at toothless individuals and telling them that there is nothing hard one could eat when one is toothless except bean sprouts but the fact is bean sprouts are not that soft so to speak.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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laughing eyes

Many years back, schools of dolphins used  to  swim  with  the  ferries  that  ply

the waters of Penang and Butterworth. I  used  to  look  forward  to  those  rides

because of that and jumped in delight upon seeing  them. Then, they  were  no

more.  Perhaps they migrated for  reasons  known  only  to  them.  Lately,  they

were spotted again in schools of twenties and although I welcome their return,

there is a tinge of sadness in me  about  our  environment  and  the  industries

that  dump  pollutants  without  mercy.  Did  they  return   because   the   waters

somewhere they went to is no longer viable for them to live?  Is global warming

taking its toll? Or was it a sign of things to come? Guess we wouldn’t be able to

know what their laughing eyes tell..

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Chiak Chai Chiak Kuay Chi

(Version in Hokkien)

Chiak Chai Chiak Kuay Chi

Sin Ku Gau Liau Li

Phuay Hu Pien Chin Swee

Lang Kh’nua Mah Siong Tui

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(Version in English)

Eating vegetables and fruits

Takes care of one’s health

Complexion once dull is now beaming

Anyone who sees it would surely be attracted.

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About this rhyme:~

This rhyme explains the benefits of eating more fruits and vegetables.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chau K’nui Si Tor Pui

(Version in Hokkien)

Chau K’nui Si Tor Pui

Tuala Luan Chu Oui

Ka Ho Thau K’nui K’nui

Tay Ho Hor Kow Tui

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(Version in English)

Fatty, your private part is showing

Don’t even know how to wear a towel properly

Better to strip bare

And then be chased by a dog!

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About this rhyme:~

Hokkiens just love to tease stout people and they have concocted many rhymes so that they could recite happily.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chit Lay Pai Kut Sien

(Version in Hokkien)

Chit Lay Pai Kut Sien

Khi Bar Bi Hoon Ean

Tu Tiok Ang Mor Ma’am

Kh’uai Kh’uai Ka Ee Sien

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(Version in English)

There was a skinny man

Inhaling smoke at the bar

Met some western ladies

Flirt as fast as he can!

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About this rhyme:~

This is a short Hokkien rhyme that speaks about the habit of one flirt.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Eow Kin Sim Ho

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Eow Kin Sim Ho

Bo Kuan Cho Hami Pun Ho

Lang Eh Kong Ka Lili Lolo

Eow Kin Sim Lai Mai Or Lo So

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(Version in English)

Most importantly one must possess a heart of gold

It doesn’t matter what one does or plans to do

We can talk about it till the sun goes down but

Most importantly the heart must not be wicked.

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About this rhyme:~

This Hokkien rhyme emphasizes the need to be good.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Ai Oo Chi Khi

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Ai Oo Chi Khi

Mai Lang Khnua Bay Kh’i

Hibang Lang Bay Liau Si

Ka Hoe Kor Ka Ki

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(Version in English)

One has to has dignity

So that others will not look down on us

If we depend on others, the habit won’t stop

So it is better to be self sufficient.

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About this rhyme:~

The Chinese has a set standard in how one should live their live and this Hokkien rhyme is one that explains one’s social conduct.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chwee Khang Meh Ang

(Version in Hokkien)

Chwee Khang Meh Ang

Chwee Khor Meh Bor

Chwee Chniar Meh Knia

Chwee Chniau Hor Lang Kiau

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(Version in English)

Mouth empty scold own husband

Mouth bitter scold own wife

Mouth bland scold own children

Mouth itch let others teach.

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About this rhyme:~

This Hokkien rhyme emphasizes the trait of a ‘satire’ who ended up being ridiculed for his thoughtlessness.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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One By One

(Version in Hokkien)

One By One

Hero Phak Snua Huan

Two By Two

Hero Phak Sio Tu

Three By Three

Hero Hor Lang Tui

Four By Four

Hero Chow Bo Lor

Five By Five

Hero Hor Lang Kh’nai

Six By Six

Hero Khoon Tit Tit

Aneh Arn Chnua Ay Cho Hero

Sau Chit Liap Tok Swee Swee Toe

Hor Lang Thay Ee Huan Loe

Lu Kh’nua Kay Boe Bo Kay Boe

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(Version in English)

One by one

Hero killed the Red Indians

Two by two

Hero killed the wild boars

Three by three

Hero was chased by his enemy

Four by four

Hero was trapped

Five by five

Hero was then knuckled

Six by six

Hero fell flat on the ground

So how can a hero be like that

Just a swing and he fell flat

And let others worry over him

So isn’t this hero a chicken after all?

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About this rhyme:~

This is a funny children’s rhyme we used to recite when we were younger. Puts a smile on people’s faces on hearing it.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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