Chiak Chai Chiak Kuay Chi

(Version in Hokkien)

Chiak Chai Chiak Kuay Chi

Sin Ku Gau Liau Li

Phuay Hu Pien Chin Swee

Lang Kh’nua Mah Siong Tui

.

(Version in English)

Eating vegetables and fruits

Takes care of one’s health

Complexion once dull is now beaming

Anyone who sees it would surely be attracted.

.

About this rhyme:~

This rhyme explains the benefits of eating more fruits and vegetables.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Chau K’nui Si Tor Pui

(Version in Hokkien)

Chau K’nui Si Tor Pui

Tuala Luan Chu Oui

Ka Ho Thau K’nui K’nui

Tay Ho Hor Kow Tui

.

(Version in English)

Fatty, your private part is showing

Don’t even know how to wear a towel properly

Better to strip bare

And then be chased by a dog!

.

About this rhyme:~

Hokkiens just love to tease stout people and they have concocted many rhymes so that they could recite happily.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Chit Lay Pai Kut Sien

(Version in Hokkien)

Chit Lay Pai Kut Sien

Khi Bar Bi Hoon Ean

Tu Tiok Ang Mor Ma’am

Kh’uai Kh’uai Ka Ee Sien

.

(Version in English)

There was a skinny man

Inhaling smoke at the bar

Met some western ladies

Flirt as fast as he can!

.

About this rhyme:~

This is a short Hokkien rhyme that speaks about the habit of one flirt.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Lang Eow Kin Sim Ho

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Eow Kin Sim Ho

Bo Kuan Cho Hami Pun Ho

Lang Eh Kong Ka Lili Lolo

Eow Kin Sim Lai Mai Or Lo So

.

(Version in English)

Most importantly one must possess a heart of gold

It doesn’t matter what one does or plans to do

We can talk about it till the sun goes down but

Most importantly the heart must not be wicked.

.

About this rhyme:~

This Hokkien rhyme emphasizes the need to be good.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Lang Ai Oo Chi Khi

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Ai Oo Chi Khi

Mai Lang Khnua Bay Kh’i

Hibang Lang Bay Liau Si

Ka Hoe Kor Ka Ki

.

(Version in English)

One has to has dignity

So that others will not look down on us

If we depend on others, the habit won’t stop

So it is better to be self sufficient.

.

About this rhyme:~

The Chinese has a set standard in how one should live their live and this Hokkien rhyme is one that explains one’s social conduct.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.