Chwee Khang Meh Ang

(Version in Hokkien)

Chwee Khang Meh Ang

Chwee Khor Meh Bor

Chwee Chniar Meh Knia

Chwee Chniau Hor Lang Kiau

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(Version in English)

Mouth empty scold own husband

Mouth bitter scold own wife

Mouth bland scold own children

Mouth itch let others teach.

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About this rhyme:~

This Hokkien rhyme emphasizes the trait of a ‘satire’ who ended up being ridiculed for his thoughtlessness.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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how to write good poems 4

ruot yduts a no ton era eW .traeh ruo fo opmet eht era sdroW

nehw  eciojer  dna dezirogetac dah steop rehto tahw nrael ot

fo sretemirep eht yb tniartsnoc eceip lufituaeb a mrof nac ew

oS  .traeh  ruo ot netsil ot ereh era eW .elyts eht ot mialc rieht

.ylluferac netsil

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One By One

(Version in Hokkien)

One By One

Hero Phak Snua Huan

Two By Two

Hero Phak Sio Tu

Three By Three

Hero Hor Lang Tui

Four By Four

Hero Chow Bo Lor

Five By Five

Hero Hor Lang Kh’nai

Six By Six

Hero Khoon Tit Tit

Aneh Arn Chnua Ay Cho Hero

Sau Chit Liap Tok Swee Swee Toe

Hor Lang Thay Ee Huan Loe

Lu Kh’nua Kay Boe Bo Kay Boe

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(Version in English)

One by one

Hero killed the Red Indians

Two by two

Hero killed the wild boars

Three by three

Hero was chased by his enemy

Four by four

Hero was trapped

Five by five

Hero was then knuckled

Six by six

Hero fell flat on the ground

So how can a hero be like that

Just a swing and he fell flat

And let others worry over him

So isn’t this hero a chicken after all?

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About this rhyme:~

This is a funny children’s rhyme we used to recite when we were younger. Puts a smile on people’s faces on hearing it.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Fei Chai Fei Tut Tut

(1st Version in Hokkien)

Fei Chai Fei Tut Tut

Or Si Or Mm Chut

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(1st Version in English)

Fat and chubby boy

Is constipating!

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

Fei Chai Fei Tut Tut

Khnuar Liau Pho Lai Chup

San Ka San Kiu Kiu

Soo Boon Bo Lau Chiu

Or Nya Or Kiak Kiak

Chin Sui Siang Buay Yak

Pek Nya Pek Sut Sut

Kare Khnua Ch’wooi Nua Chut

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(2nd Version in English)

Fat and chubby boy

The minute you see him, you feel like hugging him

To be healthy is not being skinny

Look modest without a beard or a moustache

Dark skinned women is like the night sky

Very pretty like a butterfly

Fair skinned women is as pale as a ghost

But on second glance, our mouth waters

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(3rd Version in Hokkien)

Fei Chai Fei Tut Tut

Or Si Or Siput!

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(3rd Version in English)

Fat and chubby boy

Is constipating mussels!

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About this rhyme:~

I really wonder how the first line ‘Fei Chai Fei Tut Tut’ which is in Cantonese got mixed into a Hokkien Rhyme. There are three versions here.  The 1st version above is meant to poke fun at fat chubby people whereas the 2nd version is just a rhyme that doesn’t have a common meaning to it. The first half of the second version talks about boys whereas the second part is about girls. As for the third version, it speaks about a chubby boy with an unusual excreta!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Or Kim Or Kim

(1st Version in Hokkien)

Or Kim, Or Kim

Ju Khnua Ju Jib Sim

Pek Si, Pek Si

Ju Khnua Ju Gili!

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(1st Version in English)

Dark and glossy, Dark and glossy

The more you see, the more it captures your heart

Fair and pale, Fair and pale

The more you see, the more discontented you become!

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

Or Kim, Or Kim

Ju Khnua Ju Jib Sim

Or Kim, Or Kim

Ju Khnua Ju Ai Chim!

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(2nd Version in English)

Dark and glossy, Dark and glossy

The more you see, the more it captures your heart

Dark and glossy, Dark and glossy

The more you see, the more you wanted to kiss!

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About this rhyme:~

‘Or Kim Or Kim’ is a Hokkien rhyme that sings praises for dark skinned people. Quite often you will hear this at wedding dinners when a bride or a groom weds a darker skinned partner and when one guest discreetly commented over how dark the partner looks (but often said without discrimination), another friend would utter this rhyme to put a smile back on the faces of those who heard it.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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