still will

still

I am fascinated

by your spirit

by your haste

that at will

I am moved

by your words

by your aura

that at will

I am fixated

by your worth

by your curve

that at will

I am awed

by your magic

by your zest

still

I will

for life

still

.

.

.

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Cho Lang Cho Ka Ho

(Version in Hokkien)

Cho Lang Cho Ka Ho

Ow Lai Tit Tiok Po

Cho Lang Cho Sniau Phnai

Ow Lai Tok Ay Chai

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(Version in English)

Be a good person

In order to prosper in the future

If one tries to be bad

The future would be uncertain..

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying encourages one to do good always.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Khar Chwni Chiam

(Version in Hokkien)

Khar Chwni Chiam

Kui Jit Chay Bay Tiam

Khar Sneh Seng Gatai

Titi Sniau Khi Kai Kai

.

(Version in English)

Young boy has sharp buttocks

Can’t sit still the whole day

The leg itches without a reason

Always look for excuses to go out..

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About this rhyme:~

‘Khar Chwni Chiam’ is a Hokkien phrase that describes hyperactive people or those who possesses this trait.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Gong Knia Sai

(Version in Hokkien)

Gong Knia Sai

Puak Tai Sai

Tua Sit Pai

Bor An Chnua Kau Tai

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(Version in English)

Dumb groom

Went gambling

Loses all

Later who’d be responsible for your wife?

.

About this rhyme:~

This rhyme speaks about what gambling can do to the newly weds. ‘Tai Sai’ is a type of game gamblers play.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Bo Ch’wooi Khi Sai

(Version in Hokkien)

Bo Ch’wooi Khi Sai

Kong Uwa Ch’ow Ling Tai

Chiak Pnui Kong Sai

Chin Ch’nya Bo Akai

.

(Version in English)

One with no teeth

Slurs in his speech

Talks cock at the dining table

A brainless person..

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About this rhyme:~

This rhyme criticizes inconsiderate people but it can also be used to poke fun at close ones who accidentally slurs.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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.

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Apek Khi Chwee Tar

(Version in Hokkien)

Apek Khi Chwee Tar

Ah Po Khi Latar

Apek Soak Ah Phien

Ah Po Khnuar Liau Gien

.

(Version in English)

Old man was thirsty

Old woman caught fit

Old man smoking opium

Old woman was tempted..

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About this rhyme:~

The is a fun but meaningless rhyme. ‘Apek’ and ‘Ah Po’ is used to address senior citizens whom we are unfamiliar with.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ho Lai Ho Khi

(Version in Hokkien)

Ho Lai Ho Khi

Oo Pai Oo Por Pi

Oo Chiak Oo Chai Khi

Oo Cheng Oo Hock Khi

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(Version in English)

One good turn deserves another

If one prays one will surely be blessed

Eat well and there is wealth in store

Dress well and there’d be fortune coming..

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About this rhyme:~

The first two lines of this rhyme is sound advice. However, the last two sounded like a superstition!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Apek Hor Gu Tek

(Version in Hokkien)

Apek Hor Gu Tek

Ah Mm Hor Chim Gnek

Apek Bay Apong

Ah Mm Thiow Tam Pong

Apek Chay Mui Teng

Ah Mm Thiow Ronggeng

Apek Tiok Boh Hu

Ah Mm Chiak Huan Chu

Apek Khi Ooi Knua

Ah Mm Lau Chin Knua

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(Version in English)

Uncle was underpinned by a cow

Auntie was bitten by a crab

Uncle sells ‘Apong’ (a local savory made with eggs and grated coconut)

Auntie dances the ‘Tampong’ (a local Malay dance)

Uncle sits on the threshold of the door

Auntie dances the “Ronggeng’ (another local Malay dance)

Uncle catches no fish for the day

Auntie ended up eating baked potatoes

Uncle started feeling the goose bumps

Auntie started to sweat profusely..

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About this rhyme:~

This is a rhyme recited in jest and centers around an uncle and auntie.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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