Ho Lang Bo Eng Cho

(Version in Hokkien)

Ho Ang Bo Eng Chuay

Siang Ka Thni Po Puay

Ho Bor Bo Eng Tu

Siang Ka Thni Sian Hu

Ho Knia Bo Eng Chi

Tu Huay Thni Por Pi

Ho Lang Bo Eng Cho

Tu Huay Kee Siew To

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(Version in English)

A good husband is hard to find

Like precious gems they fall from the sky

A good wife is hard to meet

Like a fairy they too fall from the sky

A good child is difficult to raise

Unless we receive God’s grace

It is not easy to be a good person

Unless we uphold righteousness..

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks about the importance of righteousness.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Mm Chai Si

(Version in Hokkien)

Mm Chai Si

Kio Bay Khi

Eng Ka Si

Ch’i Liau Bi

Thoot Laki

Goyang Kaki

Poon Tnua Si

Khun Mai Khi

Or Ph’ni Khang

Ko Khin Sang

Chay Kang Kang

Tayah Khang

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(Version in English)

Never know death

Can’t wake up when called

Too carefree

What a waste of rice!

Rubbing off the body dirt

Shaking legs

Lazy as hell

Refuse to wake up

Digging his nose

Feeling so relax

Sitting bold legged

While pocket is empty..

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About this rhyme:~

This rhyme is aimed at lazybones and how others detest their loafing habits.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ah Nya Chi

(Version in Hokkien)

Ah Nya Chi

Cha Cha Khi

Khi Lai Say Bin

Thut Chwee Khi

Chang Aik Kuay

Park Beh Buay

Tiam Chwee Toon

Buak Phang Hoon

Cheng Cheongsam

Khi Lenggang

Hibang Chuay Tiok Ho Giak Ang

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(Version in English)

Young damsel

Wake up early

Go wash your face

Then brush your teeth

After having bathed

Braid your hair

Put on some lipstick

Buff on the powder

Wear your Cheongsam

Then gait to town

Hopefully you’d meet a wealthy suitor!

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About this rhyme:~

This rhyme is a friendly advise to young women in search of suitors.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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waters of spring

we have never met

when the sun rises

will  we  ever  meet

when the sun sets?

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when spring  hath  brought  crops

wisping  flowers  to  your   garden

why   then    must    you    conceal

when others  could  only  saunter

when   others  could   only   coffer

wishful  fluffs  of   its   fragrance?

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why must summer beget suspicion?

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when  autumn  doth  scald

when  life   began   to   wilt

will you then  yearn  for  the

waters     of      spring      or

wallow  in  wait  for  winter?

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we have never met

when the sun rises

will  we  ever  meet

when the sun sets?

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