Kow Jin Tua Chu Lang

(Version in Hokkien)

Kow Jin Tua Chu Lang

Bo Jin Gua Bin Lang

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(Version in English)

Dogs only recognises their master

Not outsiders

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks of loyalty and futility in trying to convince others to your viewpoint when they have their own mindset and believe which may also be guided by what their superior wanted them to carry out.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Sim Ho Lang O Lo

(Version in Hokkien)

Sim Ho

Lang O Lo

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(Version in English)

A good heart

Wins praises from others

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying praises people who possesses good traits. They will be well respected.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Kiam, Lang Kow Kwai

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Kiam

Ka Looi Sniau Liam

Lang Kow Kwai

Cho Luan Say Kai

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(Version in English)

If a person is miserly

It is because he got too close to money

If a person is a schemer

He will turn the world upside down.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks about two kinds of people. The miser and the schemer. And it implicates the kind of danger and disaster one would be exposed to if one were to co-relate with a schemer than a miser.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chiak Peh Hoon, Miar Bay Oon

(Version in Hokkien)

Chiak Peh Hoon

Miar Bay Oon

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(Version in English)

Consuming Heroin

Won’t assure you a long life.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying sends out a clear cut message to drug addicts about the dangers.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Knia Oo Hau, Knia Kut Lat

(Version in Hokkien)

Knia Oo Hau

Kor Peh Bo Lau

Knia Kut Lat

Sneh Liau Lat

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(Version in English)

Filial offsprings

Will take care of their parents

Hardworking offsprings

Doesn’t need much guidance

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying praises filial and hardworking children but also acts as a constant reminder to children about the importance of these values.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Siow Lian Kay

(1st Version in Hokkien)

Siow Lian Kay

Ai Choot Say

Khye Looi Ay

Siew Looi Bay

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(1st Version in English)

Youngsters

Tend to show off

They know how to spend

But not to save.

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

Siow Lian Kay

Hau Lian Ay

Sniau Chin Ay

Bay Pnai Say

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(2nd Version in English)

Youngsters

Tend to show off

Think highly of oneself

Do not know shame!

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks about the traits of youngsters who loves to dress fine, eat fine and show off. And so they keep spending but never know how to save for a rainy day

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ah Ba Ko Ah Nya Chi

(Version in Hokkien)

Ah Ba Ko

Ah Nya Chi

Um Um Khoon

U’nwa U’nwa Khi

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(Version in English)

Young men

Young women

Sleep late

Woke up late

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About this rhyme:~

This rhyme speaks about the traits of youngsters who loves to paint the town red and jolly till late and when the sun rises, they were all caught slumbering when others had already gone to work.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lim Chiu Sian

(Version in Hokkien)

Lim Chiu Sian

Knia Lor Tian Tian

Kooi Jit Mabuk

Tisi Kah Ay Oak

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(Version in English)

Alcoholic

Stumbling as you walk

Getting drunk the whole day

When are you going to learn?

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying advises against excessive drinking.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Puak Kiau Keh Huay Liau

(Version in Hokkien)

Puak Kiau

Keh Huay Liau

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(Version in English)

Gambling

Takes away one’s fortune

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying advises one against compulsive gambling. For it is said that where the Chinese are, there gambling would be and many have lost a great fortune because of it resulting in hardship within one’s family. There are other serious implications such as stealing and robbing as a result of losing everything on the gambling table.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Oo Looi, Lang Bo Looi

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Oo Looi

Chit Si Kay Lang Tui

Lang Bo Looi

Chit Si Kay Kui Tua Tui

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(Version in English)

If one is rich

Suitors are everywhere

If one is poor

They are found everywhere.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying addresses a commonplace truth of the south east and the effects of what fortune can do.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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