Kow Jin Tua Chu Lang

(Version in Hokkien)

Kow Jin Tua Chu Lang

Bo Jin Gua Bin Lang

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(Version in English)

Dogs only recognises their master

Not outsiders

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks of loyalty and futility in trying to convince others to your viewpoint when they have their own mindset and believe which may also be guided by what their superior wanted them to carry out.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Sim Ho Lang O Lo

(Version in Hokkien)

Sim Ho

Lang O Lo

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(Version in English)

A good heart

Wins praises from others

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying praises people who possesses good traits. They will be well respected.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Kiam, Lang Kow Kwai

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Kiam

Ka Looi Sniau Liam

Lang Kow Kwai

Cho Luan Say Kai

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(Version in English)

If a person is miserly

It is because he got too close to money

If a person is a schemer

He will turn the world upside down.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks about two kinds of people. The miser and the schemer. And it implicates the kind of danger and disaster one would be exposed to if one were to co-relate with a schemer than a miser.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chiak Peh Hoon, Miar Bay Oon

(Version in Hokkien)

Chiak Peh Hoon

Miar Bay Oon

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(Version in English)

Consuming Heroin

Won’t assure you a long life.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying sends out a clear cut message to drug addicts about the dangers.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Knia Oo Hau, Knia Kut Lat

(Version in Hokkien)

Knia Oo Hau

Kor Peh Bo Lau

Knia Kut Lat

Sneh Liau Lat

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(Version in English)

Filial offsprings

Will take care of their parents

Hardworking offsprings

Doesn’t need much guidance

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying praises filial and hardworking children but also acts as a constant reminder to children about the importance of these values.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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