Gong Gong Bo Suay Ong

(Version in Hokkien)

Gong Gong Bo Suay Ong

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(Version in English)

One may be stupid but one may also be blessed with alot of luck.

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This rhyme/proverb/saying confirms stories about poor people striking it rich in social welfare lotteries hence this saying.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chye Uak Oo Hau

(Version in Hokkien)

Chye Uak Oo Hau

Ho Kuay Si Liau Tuay Kah Kau

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(Version in English)

Better to have filial offsprings when one is alive

Than to be faithfully worshiped upon after death.

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This rhyme/proverb/saying preaches Confucianism and its tenets about filial piety.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Keong Hee Huat Chye

(Version in Hokkien)

Keong Hee Huat Chye

Ang Pow Chit Pow Lai

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(Version in English)

Wishing you a Happy and Prosperous New Year

May I have one Red Packet please?

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying is normally uttered by children to the adults during Chinese New Year where it is customary that the elder gives them a red colored packet(Ang Pow) containing money as an expression of good luck throughout the new year. Nevetheless adults narrates this in jest when they meet friends and relatives to poke fun!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Choon Kuay Chooi Bo Hoon

(Version in Hokkien)

Choon Kuay Chooi Bo Hoon

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(Version in English)

The vessel sailed by with no traces of ripple behind.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying speaks about ungrateful people as they tend to forget favors as quickly as when they needed them.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Tiok Pnia Ka Eh Ho Mia

(Version in Hokkien)

Tiok Pnia Ka Eh Ho Mia

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(Version in English)

One needs to strive to have a promising future ahead.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This traditional rhyme/saying is self explanatory and a sound advice to the lazy!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Oui Lor Chay E’ni E’ni

(Version in Hokkien)

Oui Lor Chay E’ni E’ni

Sin Ni Tua Tharn Ch’ni

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(Version in English)

To gather around the steamboat, we need to sit in circles

When the New Year arrives, we would all be busily making money.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This traditional rhyme/saying sounded like a superstition and if one doesn’t follow the rules, bad luck would befall them.  Actually it is just a saying because there is no other way a family can gather around a steamboat if they do not sit round the table!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Lang Khoe Lang Tua

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Khoe Lang Tua

Lang Khoe Lang Lau

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(Version in English)

People depend on people in daily living

People depend on people in old age.

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About this rhyme/ditty/proverb/saying:~

Like a wise saying, it goes to say that this traditional rhyme/proverb/saying emphasizes the need of people to appreciate others warts and all otherwise who else could we could rely or hope on in the future?

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Kaik Khi Chiak Kar Ki

(Version in Hokkien)

Kaik Khi Chiak Kar Ki

Ay Loon Tharn Kim Toon

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(Version in English)

If one is stressed, one will regret

Patience brings you richest.

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This traditional rhyme/proverb/saying appeal for patience in handling situations because if one is easily stressed, one would start throwing tantrums, be offensive or do the unthinkable resulting in the loss of opportunity, business or one’s dearest friends. Patience on the other hand reaps rewards!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chit Nor Snar Si Gor

(Version in Hokkien)

Chit Nor Snar Si Gor

Ang Mor Bo Cheng Khor

Huan Nar Nak Oak Cheng Khor

T’ng Lang Toke Chow Bo Lor

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(Version in English)

One. Two, Three, Four, Five

Westerner did not wear his pants

If the Malays were to learn how to wear pants

The Chinese would have no where to go.

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About this rhyme/ditty/proverb/saying:~

This traditional rhyme/ditty/proverb/saying laments the peril of Chinese immigrants who somehow felt that the Westerners did not fulfill their promise at one time and as a consequence, once their Malay counterpart learns how to administrate or stand on their own two feet (hence the expression “to wear pants”) , the Chinese would surely have nowhere to go!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chneh Gu Mm Bat Hor

(Version in Hokkien)

Hu Phak Thor

Heh Chua Bor

Chneh Gu Mm Bat Hor

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(Version in English)

The fish is courting

The prawn is marrying

A green cow hardly recognizes the tiger.

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About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying teaches one to be humble. It describes people who underestimate the influence, capability or ability of others and more often than not ended up being humbled after being challenged upon or when challenging others. The first two verses has no meaning at all but shouts “ridiculousness” as how ridiculous and unbecoming we are to challenge those whom we are not familiar with!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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