Kin Chiong Khi Tua Korng

(Version in Hokkien)

Kin Chiong Khi Tua Korng

Bo Sniar Luan Choo Chorng

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(Version in English)

When one is excited one become hasty

Without a sound one rushes ahead!

 

About this rhyme/saying:~

This witty rhyme/saying cautions us to be compose at all time as accidents could happen if we are careless.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Tua Chiak Tua Parng

(Version in Hokkien)

Tua Chiak Tua Parng

Tua Khoon Tua Barng

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(Version in English)

Eat alot and you will shit alot

Sleep alot and you will dream alot.

 

About this rhyme/saying:~

This witty rhyme/saying describes our in built eco system inside our body but honestly can we dispute it!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chit Sim Nor Ee

(Version in Hokkien)

Chit Sim Nor Ee

Buek Khi Ko Mai Khi

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(Version in English)

One heart, two intents

Wanted to go yet hesitate to.

 

About this rhyme/saying:~

This rhyme/saying describes people who are indecisive.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chit Nor Snar

(Version in Hokkien)

Chit Nor Snar

Chang Aik Bo Cheng Snar

Chit Nor Snar Si

Chang Liow Bo Tai Chi

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(Version in English)

One, Two, Three

Bathe without clothes one

One, Two, Three, Four

Once bathe ail is well!

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About this rhyme:~

This is a witty Hokkien childhood rhyme/ditty that is recited to the child when they are bathed. In the olden days where there are no water heaters, the water tends to be very cold and children dread bathing. Many ended up crying so the mothers would recite this rhyme/ditty while cusping some of the tub water to tap on the baby’s chest to make them adapt to the water temperature and psychologically, it tends to make the children forget about the chill as they recite along happily with their parents! Some adults chant this before the bathe to entice the child and the child on hearing this will spontaneously run to the adult to have their clothes taken off to be bathed!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Bo Hu Heh Ma Ho

(Version in Hokkien)

Bo Hu Heh Ma Ho

Bo Arn Nya Sian Ah So

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(Version in English)

If there are no fish, prawns are just as good

If there are no young damsels, then tackle the older ones!

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About this rhyme:~

This is a witty Hokkien rhyme. It discourages fastidiousness in everything especially when one is in search of a life partner` that one cannot afford to be too cautious and mindful about the little flaws otherwise one would end up single for the rest of one’s life.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Cho Ho Sim

(Version in Hokkien)

Cho Ho Sim

Hor Lui Chim

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(Version in English)

To do good

And let the lighting strike you.

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About this rhyme:~

Although directly translated as such, this Hokkien rhyme/proverb/saying doesn’t discourage one to do good. What it means is occasionally when one does another a good favor, quite often they are often taken for granted and that good favor won’t be repaid when one is in need so this rhyme/proverb/saying encourages one to be mindful~ that it is wonderful to help but do not allow oneself to be used as it might lead to problems. The best example are the drug carriers who often victimizes good Samaritans to carry luggages on behalf of them through the customs and are thence arrested!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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A-B-C

(Version in Hokkien)

A-B-C

Wa Phar Lu, Lu Phar Ee

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(Version in English)

A-B-C

I beat you, You beat him.

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About this rhyme:~

This is a Hokkien childhood  rhyme. Meaningless, but often heard in traditional games to select the individual who would kickstart the game.Very much like the tossing of the coin to determine which side shall start, this rhyme works in the same fashion but its usefulness became apparent when an unspecified number of individual players is involved in the game. As he recites each syllable, the player appointed by the group to recite the rhyme will point his finger concurrently to the next player gathered in front of him be it in clockwise or anticlockwise fashion and the person pointed at when the last syllable is recited would be it. For example, in the game of hide and seek, the person pointed at shall be the seeker and the rest will all hide.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Si Chap Kau Pang Lai Hau

(Version in Hokkien)

Si Chap Kau

Pang Lai Hau

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(Version in English)

Forty Nine

Left them crying

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This Hokkien rhyme/proverb/saying discourages older women (e.g a woman at forty-nine years of age) to give birth because one would not live that long to ensure one’s child would be well taken care of.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Oo Mnia Men Knia Thnia

(Version in Hokkien)

Oo Mnia

Men Knia Thnia

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(Version in English)

As long as one’s lifeline is intact

One should not complain about pain.

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This Hokkien rhyme/proverb/saying encourages one to have a fighting spirit. To toil is fine and to tolerate pain like a women’s labor is also fine. If one is scourge, the degree of pain one has to endure won’t be as bad as death itself.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Chiak Lau

(Version in Hokkien)

Chiak Lau

Knia Buek Oo Hau

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(Version in English)

When one reaches a golden age

What is most important is to have filial children.

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About this rhyme/proverb/saying:~

This Hokkien rhyme/proverb/saying speaks about the most important blessing one could have when one reaches one’s golden age. It is a well known saying that money cannot buy happiness and happiness stems from one’s fine offsprings who would repay back the years of toil and hardship a parent sacrifices for them by taking care of their parents in return once one gets too old. It is also a well known fact that only those who are financially incapable of fending for themselves or their own families would send their parents to old folks home. If the rich were to do that, they would be scorned!

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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