Lang Gau Thni Cho Tui Thau

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Gau

Thni Cho Tui Thau

Lang Bo Akai

Thak Chek Thak Kar Pian Sai

.

(Version in English)

If one is clever

God will pave opportunities for them

If one is stupid

Whatever one study is to no avail.

.

About this rhyme:~

This Hokkien rhyme/proverb/saying speaks about intelligence and the benefits of possessing it.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Advertisements

Bak Chiu Kim Kim

(Version in Hokkien)

Bak Chiu Kim Kim

Ai Chiak Tok Chiak

Ai Lim Tok Lim

.

(Version in English)

If one’s eyes are sharp

When one is hungry there’d be enough to eat

When one is thirsty there’d be enough to drink

.

About this Proverb/Saying:~

This Hokkien Proverb/Saying advises people to be cautious so that one won’t be cheated and has plenty to live by.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Lang Swee Chiak Bin Chwee

(Version in Hokkien)

Lang Swee Chiak Bin Chwee

Lang Bo Swee Chiak Hai Chwee

Lang Swee Kar Oo Lang Tui

Lang Bo Swee Tok Kar Oo Looi

.

(Version in English)

If one is pretty, it has to do with patronage

If one is not, drinking seawater is likely

If one is pretty, one is likely to be pursued

If one is not, most likely one is richer.

.

About this Rhyme/Proverb/Saying:~

This Hokkien Rhyme/Proverb/Saying speaks about the pros and cons of people who were born pretty as opposed to those who are not. To ‘drink seawater’ means there is a slimmer chance that one is pursued.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Kh’nua Lang Chiak Bak

(Version in Hokkien)

Kh’nua Lang Chiak Bak

Mai Kh’nua Lang Sio Phak

.

(Version in English)

Better to see people eat and make merry

Than to watch people fight.

.

About this Rhyme/Proverb/Saying:~

There is alot of truth in this Hokkien Rhyme/Proverb/Saying. In another instance it seeks to advice people about being happy than becoming angry and to make more friends than enemies.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.

Titi Poon Titi Choon

(Version in Hokkien)

Titi Poon Titi Choon

Ch’ut Ho Knia Ho Soon

.

(Version in English)

The more one gives the more abundant one becomes

And one would be blessed with good descendants.

.

About this Rhyme/Proverb/Saying:~

There is alot of truth in this Hokkien Rhyme/Proverb/Saying about alms giving and the blessings one would receive in no time at all.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

.

.

.