A-E-I-O-U

(1st Version in Hokkien)

A-E-I-O-U

Ah Mor Bay Sau Chiew!

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(1st Version in English)

A-E-I-O-U

Englishman sells brooms!

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

A-E-I-O-U

Apek Bay Sau Chiew

Sau Chiew Lin Loke Hai

Apek Chiak Kow Sai!

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(2nd Version in English)

A-E-I-O-U

Old man sells brooms

The brooms tumble into the sea

The old man thus eats doggie stools!

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

A-E-I-O-U just like “Ting Tong Tiang” is a traditional Hokkien rhyme/ditty recited in street games like “ar-chi-lo” (chasing) or “ba-ku-li” (marbles)! Very much like the tossing of the coin to determine which side shall start off with the game, this rhyme/ditty works in the same style but its usefulness became apparent when an unspecified number of individual players is involved in the game. As he recites each syllable, the player appointed by the group to recite the rhyme/ditty will point his finger concurrently to the next player gathered in front of him be it in clockwise or anticlockwise fashion and the person pointed at when the last syllable is recited would become the seeker. For example, in the game of hide and seek, the person pointed at shall be the seeker and the rest will all hide.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ting Tong Tiang

(Version in Hokkien)

Ting Tong Tiang

Chui Chui Pang Phooi, Chow Hiam Hiam

Chiak Si Kay, Bo Liam Tor

Chiak Si Neow Choo Buay, Bo Cheng Khor

Chow Khi Ow Buay Lor, Thow Thng Khor

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(Version in English)

Ting Tong Tiang

Who was the one emitting the smelly spicy fart?

Like eating a dead chicken, without the guts removed

Like eating a dead rats tail, without wearing ones trousers

Run to the back lane, pretending to take off the trousers.

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About this rhyme/ditty:~

“Ting Tong Tiang”, just like “Chui Lo Chui Peng Peng” is a childs Hokkien rhyme/ditty recited in street games like “ar-chi-lo” (chasing) or “ba-ku-li” (marbles)! Very much like the tossing of the coin to determine which side shall start off with the game, this rhyme/ditty works in the same style but its usefulness became apparent when an unspecified number of individual players is involved in the game. As he recites each syllable, the player appointed by the group to recite the rhyme/ditty will point his finger concurrently to the next player gathered in front of him be it in clockwise or anticlockwise fashion and the person pointed at when the last syllable is recited would become the seeker. For example, in the game of hide and seek, the person pointed at shall be the seeker and the rest will all hide.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Oo Lay Ho Mnia Knia

(Version in Hokkien)

Oo Lay Ho Mnia Knia

Oo Looi Bay Hiow Siew

Cha Bor Luan Chu Tui

Tatajit Lim Chiu Chui

Ch’arm Ah Kow Ah Niau

Keh Lor Luan Chu Siau

Tuay Lang Puak Tua Kiau

Keh Hoay Su Liau Liau

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(Version in English)

Some wealthy children

Fritter away their money

Womanizing

Getting drunk everyday

Mixing with bad hats

Painting the town red with their pranks

Imitating others by placing high stakes on the gambling table

And finally squanders off everything he has.

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About this Rhyme/Saying:~

This Hokkien Rhyme/Saying speaks about the habits of some very rich kids who were endowed with so much wealth yet do not know how to be prudent till one day all their wealth/ inheritance got squandered off by their own carelessness. Especially on the gambling table.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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