Mooi Lang Po

(Version in Hokkien)

Mooi Lang Po

Luan Chu Soe

Kh’nwa Lang Buek Chuay Ang

Ee Tok Khi Cho Kay Po

Bo Loon Sin Niow Ar Si Kniar Sai

Nor Peng Kor Su Long Chong Chai

Tua Kong Tang, Tuar Kong Sai

Tar Por Peng Tua O Loe

Char Bor Peng Eya Chin Hoe

Kong Kar Nor Peng Chin Ch’nia Gnam

Poh Keh Uwa Bo Luan Chu Kong

Tapi Mooi Lang Po Boe Lau Sit

Kau In Mm Mien Kuay Kwee Jit

Ang Pow Buay Hor Luan Ch’i Ch’a

Nor Peng Tau Ch’ap Tw’na Kun Kar

Choe Tin Chuay Mooi Lang Po Snui Siow

Kh’wna Tiok Swee Swee Liak Lai Kiow

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(Version in English)

Wily Matchmaker

She appears to be everywhere

If someone is searching for a lifelong partner

She is bound to be there

Be it a prospective husband or a wife

She probes the secrets of both sides

From East to West she began to sweet talk

To the groom to be’s family, she is full of praise

To the bride to be’s family, she gives warm appraise

Through her words the two sides were bonded

She even swore by her words

But matchmakers are also known to hide secrets

A few days after the marriage is sealed

Before the red packet was given, matters turned topsy turvy

As both families interfere, a feud soon erupted

But as fate would have it, both sides unite and confronted the matchmaker

A pretty damsel she is but she was not spared the thrashing!

.

About this rhyme:~

This traditional Hokkien rhyme describes the traits of a matchmaker. At least for the Hokkiens, most marriages before the fifties were consummated through the skills of a trusted matchmaker and therefore a reputable matchmaker is highly sought after. For it was through her that seals the fate of two strangers who is denied the chance to meet and have a normal date because back then, a maidens chastity is a source of family pride and therefore these women folks were hawk-guarded to avoid illustrious happenings that may tarnish the good name of her family. This explains the placement of a roasted pig with a decorated tail sitting on the altar table on the wedding night which signifies virginity.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These proverbs and sayings has always been a guide and lesson to the many who has never been to school so as to help them steer well in the river of  life and in a way, it seeks to retell their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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