Um Mong Mong

(1st Version in Hokkien)

Um Mong Mong

Niow Chu Kong

Amah Phar Ah Kong

Ah Kong Peh Khi Chang

Amah Chuey Bo Lang

Ah Kong Jiang Chit Snia

Amah Tio Chneh Knia!

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(1st Version in English)

A dark night

Grandfather rat

Grandma beat up grandpa

Grandpa took refuge up on the tree

Grandma couldn’t find him

Grandpa shouts so loud

Grandma was so shocked!

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

Um Mong Mong

Niow Chu Kong

Kar Ku Kong

.

(2nd Version in English)

A dark night

Grandfather rat

Bit grandpa.

.

(3rd Version in Hokkien)

Um Mong Mong

Amah Tui Ah Kong

Ah Kong Peh Khi Chang

Amah Chuey Bo Lang

.

(3rd Version in English)

A dark night

Grandma chases grandpa

Grandpa took refuge up on the tree

Grandma couldn’t find him.

.

(4th Version in Hokkien)

Um Mong Mong

Niow Chu Kong

Amah Chuey Ah Kong

Ah Kong Peh Khi Chang

Amah Chuey Bo Lang

.

(4th Version in English)

A dark night

Grandfather rat

Grandma was looking for grandpa

Grandpa took refuge up on the tree

Grandma couldn’t find him.

.

About this rhyme:~

“Um Mong Mong” or “A Dark Night”  describes a minor row between a golden age couple. In the early days, an extended family concept is extremely popular whereby families were encouraged to live together under one roof except for the daughters who are to be given way once they tied the knot. As a mother who bears many children who then bears her grandchildren, she is automatically elevated to the rank of matriarch~ a sort of unofficial commander of the house who makes the laws, decides on everything and oversees the daily running of it hence, the inclination towards female domination expressed in this ditty! This rhyme is very similar to another rhyme titled “Kim Po Ka Ku Kong

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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One response to “Um Mong Mong

  1. Pingback: Kim Po Ka Ku Kong | fiveloaf

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