It Leh It Thay Thay

(1st Version in Hokkien)

It Leh It Thay Thay

Ji Leh Chang Khar Chay

Snar Leh Oo Bi Chu

Si Leh Oo Tharn Thay

Goh Leh Goh Iak Iak

Lak Leh Choe Khit Chiak

Chit Leh Keng

Peh Leh Poo

Kow Leh Chng Heng Khoo

Chap Leh Tiong Chin Soo

Chap It Beh Bor Choe Tua Ku

.

(1st Version in English)

The first is irresponsible

The second is always busy

The third has rice to cook

The fourth has time to rest

The fifth is temperamental

The Sixth is a beggar

The seventh is poor

The eight is wealthy

The ninth is always regretful

The tenth is a scholar

The eleventh knows no shame..

(2nd Version in Hokkien)

It Leh It Thay Thay

Ji Leh Thow Liak Kay

Snar Leh Oo Bi Chu

Si Leh Oo Pnui Chuay

Goh Leh Goh Iak Iak

Lak Leh Choe Khit Chiak

Chit Leh Keng

Peh Leh Poo

Kow Leh Kim Cheng Koo

Chap Leh Tong Chin Soo

Chap It Beh Bor Choe Tua Ku

.

(2ndVersion in English)

The first is irresponsible

The second steals chicken

The third has rice to cook

The fourth has abundance

The fifth is temperamental

The sixth is a beggar

The seventh is poor

The eight is prosperous

The ninth has a golden mortar and pestle

The tenth is a scholar

The eleventh knows no shame..

.

About this rhyme:~

This rhyme is about the story of a man with many sons, each with a different personality.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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2 responses to “It Leh It Thay Thay

  1. Hello, thanks so much for bringing me back to my childhood when my late grandma used to recite this poem to me. She told me the poem was about how many whorls on one’s fingers….

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