Li Kong Kiu Kiu Tan

(Version in Hokkien)

Li Kong Kiu Kiu Tan

Amah Puak Lo Charn

Ah Kong Chow Khi Kharn

Amah Kong Boe Siang Karn.

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(Version in English)

The thunder keeps on roaring

Grandma fell into the paddy field

Grandpa ran to helped her up

But grandma said she’s alright..

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About this rhyme:~

This is a very short yet fun to recite because it rhymes all the way in its original lingo.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Buah Lam Bay

(1st Version in Hokkien)

Buah Lam Bay, Buah Langsat

Ang Mor Char Bor Gia Tongkat

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(1st Version in English)

Rambai fruit, Langsat fruit (local fruits)

English woman carrying a walking stick.

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

Buah Chiku, Buah Lam Bay

Ba Li Tung, Ba Li Lei!

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(2nd Version in English)

Chiku fruit, Rambai fruit (local fruits)

Spiral shaped snails, they cluster together!

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About this rhyme:~

This is a very short rhyme, meaningless but catchy to recite.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Ah Phong

(Version in Hokkien)

Ah Phong

Phong Tio Jilotong

Jilotong Tiok Huay Sio

Ah Phong Pien Char Sio

Char Sio Hor Lang Chiak

Ah Phong Pien Khar Khiak

Khar Khiak Hor Lang Cheng

Ah Phong Pien Cheng

Cheng Hor Lang Phien

Ah Phong Pien Batman

Batman Toh

Ah Phong Chay Motor

Motor Peng

Ah Phong Chay Tok Teng

Tok Teng Si Ki Khar

Ah Phong Tua Lam Phar.

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(Version in English)

Ah Phong (person’s name)

Bloating all the way to Jelutong (Jelutong is a district in Penang)

After Jelutong was razed in a fire

Ah Phong became barbequed meat

Barbequed meat to be given for others to eat

Ah Phong became clogs

While the clogs are given away for others to wear

Ah Phong became a gun

The gun was then hijacked

and Ah Phong became Batman (a western cartoon superhero)

After Batman collapses

Ah Phong sat on a motorcycle

After the motorbike overturned

Ah Phong sat on a table

The table altogether has four legs

Ah Phong possesses enlarged testicles.

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About this rhyme:~

Obviously, this rhyme is as old as “batman” himself but centers around a character named “Ah Phong”. The word “Ah” is colloquial and it is a form of address that comes before every name like how one uses the word “Mister”. The word “Phong” means “swell” or “bloated” . As usual, there is an uncanny absurdity that makes this rhyme puzzling.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Kay Po Chni

(1st Version in Hokkien)

Kay Po Chni

Snar Uar Ee

Chiak Bo Kau

Ko Chai Thni.

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(1st Version in English)

Busybody Spirit

Three bowls of glutinous rice balls (local sweet soup)

Still not enough

Again ask for another helping.

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

Kay Po Chni

Sampat Ee

Chiak Bo Kau

Ko Chai Thni.

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(2nd Version in English)

Busybody spirit

Ignorant aunty

Still not enough

Again ask for another helping.

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(3rd Version in Hokkien)

Kay Po Chni

Sampat Ee

Bo Larng Chiak

Kar Ki Thni.

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(3rd Version in English)

Busybody spirit

Ignorant aunty

No one eats

Serving oneself with another helping.

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(4th Version in Hokkien)

Kay Po Chni

Tiam Ean Chi

Ean Chi Ang

Pek Chieu Chang

Chieu Chang Toe

Chay Mo Toe

Mo Toe Peng

Khar Ch’ooi Cheng.

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(3rd Version in English)

Busybody spirit

Puts on the lipstick

The lipstick is red in color

Climbs up the tree

The tree fell

Sits on a motorcycle

The motorcycle overturned

Busybody has his buttocks swollen!

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About this rhyme:~

This rhyme pokes fun at busybodies or those who stick their noses into others affair, a trait that seldom people approve of. It is also used to vent anger at uninvited guest/gatecrashers.

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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Tua Pui

(1st Version in Hokkien)

Tua Pui, Tua Lok Lok

Pang Sai, Lo Chua Lok

Tua Pui, Tua Hai Hai

Si Liow, Bo Lang Chai!

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(1st Version in English)

Fatty, big and clumsy

You shit into the paper bag

Fatty, big and stout

If you die, nobody knows!

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(2nd Version in Hokkien)

Tua Pui, Tua Hai Hai

Siak Si, Bo Lang Chai

Tua Pui, Tua Lok Lok

Pang Sai, Tey Chua Lok!

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(2nd Version in English)

Fatty, big and stout

If you fall and die, nobody knows

Fatty, big and clumsy

Your shit is kept inside the paper bag!

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(3rd Version in Hokkien)

Tua Pui, Tua Lok Lok

Pang Sai, Lo Chua Lok

Chua Lok Tay Bay Liow

Tua Pui Chiak Ka Liow!

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(3rd Version in English)

Fatty, big and stout

Your shit went into the paper bag

Paper bag cannot contain it all

Fatty ate it all up!

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About this rhyme:~

Similar to “Gong Lang” in some lines, this rhyme pokes fun at stout people but almost always it is said in jest..

The author/owner has compiled for record, a collection of early Hokkien sayings, proverbs, rhymes and ditties to capture the essence and spirit of his hoi polloi, a community originating from the southern province of Fujian, China where individuals climbed aboard bum boats, crossing the South China Sea to settle in faraway lands to escape the brewing civil unrest and a way out from hardship carrying along with them in their journey, nothing except their trademark ponytails and their beliefs, very much rooted in Confucianism. These ditties retell their story and their lifestyle way back then so that the younger generation can gain an insight and foothold to their origin..

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